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A sigh of relief: How the Hope Scholarship helped change one student’s life

By ROGER MOONEY

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, Fla. – There was a reason for Nick Guiley’s tears and his utter refusal to get out of his father’s car at school one morning during the sixth grade.

“I felt like something was going to happen when I stepped into school,” Nick said. “That someone was going to come up and hurt me or something.”

Nick was being physically bullied by two boys at his neighborhood school near their home in Altamonte Springs, Florida. They made entering that building a nightmare for Nick.

“It’s a suspenseful feeling and you’re scared because you don’t know when it’s going to happen,” Nick said. “Where are they going to be? What class? So, I was kind of on the edge, nervous.”

He would spend entire days in the office of a guidance counselor, hiding from his tormentors.

Nick’s parents, Lisa and Todd, were unaware of this. They sensed something was troubling their youngest child. His anxiety level was high, and his heartbeat would at times reach 140 beats per minute. They took Nick to a cardiologist, who said it wasn’t physical. They took Nick to a therapist, who thought the anxiety was related to Nick having Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary, repetitive movements and vocalizations.

Nick and his father, Todd, enjoy a laugh while doing homework.

The root of the problem remained undiscovered.

“We asked him all the questions,” Lisa said. “Everything you could think of as a parent.”

Nick hid the truth with evasive answers. He was, he admitted, scared to tell his parents.

“It was kind of an embarrassing topic to bring up,” he said.

Nick didn’t know how his parents would react. He didn’t know if they would believe him. And, he didn’t have proof.

But the bullying came to light the morning he refused to leave the car. Finally, Nick talked.

“There were two boys who, literally, every chance they got, they would hurt him,” Lisa said. “He was so afraid. He wouldn’t even tell us. In his mind, all he would think was, ‘I can’t go to school.’”

A sigh of relief

Nick stood outside Lake Forrest Preparatory School in Maitland, Florida on a sunny February afternoon and talked about his experiences. Now an eighth grader, he began attending the infants-through-eight private school in January of 2020. It’s a small school with only eight children in this year’s graduating class. It was the perfect landing – small and secure – for someone like Nick.

When asked what it feels like to be dropped off at Lake Forrest in the morning, Nick said, “It’s one of the biggest sighs of relief that I ever had.”

He likes his schoolmates and his teachers. He no longer feels threatened by anyone.

“People knew my name and said ‘hi’ to me after the first couple of days, and that’s when I knew this school would be a good fit for me,” he said.

Nick attends Lake Forrest on a Hope Scholarship managed by Step Up For Students. The Hope Scholarship allows parents of children who are bullied in neighborhood schools to find new learning environments at another district school or at a participating private school – away from the bully.

“There’s no words to describe it,” Todd Guiley said. “It’s awesome. He complains when he can’t go to school.”

Lisa, Nick and Todd.

Todd and Lisa reacted quickly when Nick finally told them he was being bullied. They meet with the guidance counselor and school administrators. Nick was so traumatized that he didn’t finish the school year.

The Guileys enrolled Nick in a private school near their home for the seventh grade. Things began well, but the bullying returned in a different form. At this time, Nick had developed coprolalia, a Tourette syndrome tic which causes involuntary swearing and inappropriate language.

“Come to find out, he was hanging out with a group of kids who were pretty much emotionally bullying him,” Lisa said. “They encouraged him to cuss, and they would tell on him for doing it. They were pretending to be his friends.”

The Guileys learned of the Hope Scholarship from administrators at this school. While researching where to send Nick with the help of the scholarship, Nick struck up a friendship with a boy his age that he met at the dentist’s office. His new friend attended Lake Forrest, and his mom encouraged Lisa and Todd to visit the school, which is located 20 minutes from their home.

After meeting with Assistant Principal Ann Mallamas, Lisa and Todd decided to enroll Nick.

“My only regret is that we didn’t find this school sooner,” Todd said. “It’s been a positive experience for him all around. The teachers are great. The kids are great. He loves it.”

‘My heart is full’

In February, Step Up recently held its annual Rising Stars Award program, which recognizes scholarship students in several categories – High-Achieving, Outstanding Student character and Turnaround Student. Mallamas nominated Nick for the Turnaround Student award, and Nick was featured in the virtual Rising Stars Award video.

“I’ve seen a huge transformation from the first day that I met Nick until today,” Mallamas said. “He has developed into a wonderful young man with a past that should have never happened to him and was not called for. He’s one the sweetest, most loveable students we have at the school.”

Lisa said her son treats everyone with respect, is genuine and sincere and makes friends easy. Todd said his son is very loving. Nick described himself as kind and caring.

So why was he bullied?

“It did make me wonder why,” Nick said. “I didn’t understand it, because if I was nice to everybody, they don’t really have a reason to bully me.”

Lisa had guesses. Nick was small for his age at the time. He wore glasses. His Tourette syndrome produces tics.

Nick said he often thought of fighting back at his neighborhood school but knew that would get him into trouble. His course of action was to hope the bullying would stop, but it didn’t. It only became worse.

“It’s kind of hard to let go of the past sometimes, because it’s kind of a hard thing to not remember,” he said. “It does lessen as time goes on, but it still sticks with me to this day.”

Nick said he did wonder if the bullying would follow him to Lake Forrest.

“I had a feeling that this is what school is all about, that they would bully me, and the teachers wouldn’t care, because I had been to other schools and the process just kept repeating,” he said. “But when I got to this school there was this good atmosphere that nobody was going to be mean to me, and all the teachers were nice and caring.”

Both Lisa and Todd were devastated when they learned their son was being bullied. They wished he came to them sooner.

“The only thing that I would instill upon kids these days is don’t be afraid to come forward and stick up for yourself,” Todd said. “Go to your teacher, go to your parents, go to your counselors and let them know what’s going on. Don’t be afraid to advocate for yourself.”

Lisa stood off camera while her son was being videoed for the Rising Stars show. She listened as Nick talked about how much he loves Lake Forrest, his classmates, his teaches. He talked enthusiastically about wanting to be a marine biologist and explore the uncharted depths of the oceans.

Nick is not the only one who breathes a sigh of relief every morning when he bounces out of the house and heads to school.

“It makes me feel beyond happy,” Lisa said. “My heart is full when I know that my child is happy, and he has no anxiety. He has fun. He does his work. His grades are improving. It’s an awesome feeling as a parent.”

Roger Mooney, communications manager, marketing, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Your child is being bullied at school? There is Hope

By ROGER MOONEY

The bullying at school began when Jordyn Simmons-Outland was in the second grade. He was punched and tripped by classmates. He was teased for his weight. He once told his grandparents that he wished he were dead. He eventually saw a therapist.

Jordyn Simmons-Outland is first recipient of the Hope Scholarship for bullied students.
Jordyn Simmons-Outland is first recipient of the Hope Scholarship for bullied students.

His grandmother, Cathy Simmons, complained to Jordyn’s teachers and administrators at the neighborhood school, but the violence continued. The last straw for Cathy occurred in 2018 when Jordyn was slapped by a classmate at the start of his fifth-grade year.

What does a parent do when their child is not safe at school?

Where do they turn when their cries of, “Help! My child is being bullied!” go unanswered?

Parents and guardians talk of being frustrated by what they see as inaction by teachers and administrators at their neighborhood school.

If they Google: “Scholarships for children who are bullied,” they find the Hope Scholarship for schoolchildren who have been bullied. It is managed by Step Up For Students.

The Hope Scholarship provides an escape for K through 12 students who reported being bullied or a victim of violence in a public school.

Click here to apply for a Hope Scholarship.

According to the Florida’s School Environmental Safety Incident Reporting System, more than 47,000 students in Florida reported being a victim of bullying during the 2015-16 school year. That’s a huge number, yet it’s only the number of schoolchildren who reported an incident. Many more suffered in silence.

In 2018, the Florida Legislature decided to address the staggering number of schoolchildren who are bullied each year by creating the Hope Scholarship.

“Hope is the best description. I keep thinking ‘There is hope. There is hope. There is hope,’” Cathy Simmons said.

The Hope Scholarship, which is not based on a family’s income, provides families with financial assistance to send a child who suffered from a qualifying incident to an eligible private school, or to transport him or her to a public school in another district. The scholarship value depends on the grade level and county the family lives in.

Click here to view the 2020-21 Hope Scholarship award chart.

The transportation scholarship is worth up to $750 and can be used to attend any out-of-district public school with available space.

The scholarships are funded by consumers who choose to redirect up to $105 of their motor vehicle purchase taxes to the program.

Who is eligible?

Any public school student in Florida who was a victim of a qualifying incident at a K through 12 school, a school-related or school-sponsored program or activity or was riding in a school bus or waiting at a school bus stop.

What is a qualifying incident? They include battery, harassment, hazing, bullying, kidnapping, physical attack, robbery, sexual offenses (including harassment, assault or battery), threat or intimidation and fighting.

Cathy Simmons began looking for a private school for Jordyn after he was slapped by that classmate. She came across Lakeview Christian School in Lake Placid, Florida, which is not far from their home. That’s where she learned about the Hope Scholarship, then in its infancy.

They applied, and Jordyn became the first student in Florida to reap the benefits of the scholarship. Upon entering his new school for the first time, Jordyn said, “I new it was going to be good.”

Click here to read Jordyn’s story.

That is the idea behind the Hope Scholarship. It provides an education choice to families so their children can benefit from safer, more inviting learning environments.

Jordyn made friends. He was one of six students picked to sing at the school’s Christmas concert. A teacher wrote on his first progress report that he was “a pleasure to have in class.”

Cathy couldn’t wait to tell others about the Hope Scholarship and how it changed her grandson’s life.

“Now there is peace,” she said.

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@StepUpForStudents.org.

Step Up manages 5 education choice scholarships: Which one do you qualify for?

By Roger Mooney

The collapse of the real estate market in 2008 signaled the crumbling of the luxurious lifestyle for Helen and Frank Figueredo, who owned a real estate firm in Miami.

The recession cost them everything: Their business. Their savings. Their house. They filed for bankruptcy twice and ended up in foreclosure. They sold nearly all their possessions to make ends meet.

Jonas and Jack Figueredo

One thing that was nonnegotiable for the Figueredos was a  private education for their two sons: Jonas and Jack.

They needed financial help to make that work, and that’s where Step Up For Students came into play.

Step Up manages five scholarships that provide K through 12 education choices to students from lower-income families, those with certain special needs, students who have been bullied at a public school and struggling readers in public school in grades three through five.

A parent or guardian might ask: What scholarship do I qualify for?

Well, let’s take a look using these examples.

Scholarships for children from lower-income families

The Figueredos were eligible for a Florida Tax Credit Scholarship, one of two income-based scholarships managed by Step Up. The other is the Family Empowerment Scholarships. Both scholarships are based on a family’s financial need, and both give families a choice to find a new learning environment for their child.

Parents use a single application for the scholarships and Step Up determines eligibility for either the tax-credit scholarship or the newer Family Empowerment Scholarship.

In the case of the Figueredos, it was the Westwood Christian School, a private pre-K through 12 school near their Miami home. Both boys entered when they were eligible for pre-K. Jonas recently graduated from the private school near the top of his class with a scholarship to the University of Miami. Jack just completed his sophomore year and is following in his brother’s academic footsteps.

Scholarships for children with certain special needs

Phyllis Ratliff worried about her son Nicolas.

Diagnosed with high-functioning autism at age three, Nicholas was nearing the end of the eighth grade. It was time for Phyllis to search for a high school that could accommodate her son’s needs.

Nicolas Ratliff-Batista and Kiwi relaxing at home.

She feared that the large neighborhood high school would present a threatening environment, that Nicholas would be an easy target for bullies. She worried that Nicholas would be intimidated by the large class sizes.

A friend told her about Monsignor Pace High School, located in Miami Lakes, 10 miles from their home. Upon visiting the school, Phyliss learned of the Gardiner Scholarship, which allows parents to personalize the education of their pre-K through 12 children with certain special needs by directing money toward a combination of approved programs and providers. (A list of special needs covered by the Gardiner Scholarship is found here under “eligibility requirements.”)

The Gardiner Scholarship helped cover the tuition at Pace.

Phyllis was relieved.

“That was phenomenal,” Phyllis said. “We were so excited there was something out there for him.”

Nicolas graduated with honors and recently finished his first year at Broward College, where he is studying environmental science.

Scholarship for students who have been bullied

Jordyn Simmons-Outland had been a target of bullies in his public school since the second grade. The physical and emotional toll over the next two years was so intense that Jordyn told his grandparents that he wished he were dead. He began to see a therapist.

Jordyn Simmons-Outland

In 2018, the Florida Legislature created the Hope Scholarship to give relief for K-12 public school children from bullying and violence. The program provides families with financial assistance to send a child to an eligible private school, or to transport him to a public school in another district.

Jordyn was the first-ever recipient of the Hope Scholarship. He began attending Lakeview Christian School in Lake Placid, Florida as a fifth grader in the fall of 2018.

“Hope is the best description (for the scholarship). I keep thinking ‘There is hope, there is hope, there is hope,’” said Cathy Simmons, Jordyn’s grandmother. “I can’t wait to tell everyone what a blessing the Hope Scholarship has been. Now there’s peace.”

Scholarship for students struggling to read

In third grade, Kiersten Covic’s reading score on the Florida Standards Assessments (FSA) was high enough where it signaled that she would likely excel in English Language Arts the following school year.

Instead, her grade plummeted to “below satisfactory.”

It wasn’t the only thing that plunged. So did her confidence.

Kiersten Covic

Fortunately, her mother, Kelly Covic, learned about the Reading Scholarship Accounts managed by Step Up For Students that could help pay for a reading program called ENCORE! Reading at Kiersten’s school, Dayspring Academy.

In 2018, Florida lawmakers created the reading scholarship to help public school students in third through fifth grade who struggle with reading. The program offers parents access to Education Savings Accounts, worth $500 each, to pay for tuition and fees for approved part-time tutoring, summer and after-school literacy programs, instructional materials and curriculum related to reading or literacy.

Third through fifth grade public school students who scored a 1 or 2 on the third or fourth grade English Language Arts (ELA) section of the Florida Standards Assessments in the prior year are eligible. (Due to COVID-19, the reading portion of the test was canceled. The Florida Department of Education is assessing eligibility requirements for the 2020-21 school year.)

With a score of 2 on the English Language Arts section of the test, Kiersten qualified. Her mother applied for the scholarship, was approved and enrolled Kiersten into the program at the A-rated public charter school in New Port Richey during the 2018-19 school year.

The program was enough to boost her reading grade on the state test to a 3, a perfectly acceptable grade to put her back on track for success.

“We were really, really thrilled and relieved,” said her mom.

Again, to learn more about the Step Up scholarships, click here. To read more stories about how those scholarships impact the lives of the
Step Up scholars, click here.

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.