Donate

Tag Archives forOklahoma State University

Look who rode in on her friendly horse: Jen Canning, one of Step Up For Students’ newest team members

By Jen Canning, Step Up For Students Executive Assistant

CaptureBehindthescenesHowdy y’all! I’m Jen, one of the newest members of the Step Up For Students team. My background is in horses and cattle, and I grew up working on my family’s ranch in Lipan, Texas. I studied animal science at Oklahoma State University, and it was there I developed a special place in my heart for children.

While attending OSU, I began volunteering for a nonprofit therapeutic horseback riding facility for children with special needs. This organization helped children with all kinds of unique needs, from Down syndrome to cerebral palsy and fetal alcohol syndrome. I dedicated much of my college life to working with these kids and discovered there is no one-size-fits-all education for these students. This belief led me to join Step Up for Students after completing my Masters of Business Administration from University of South Florida in St Petersburg.

Jen Canning, executive assistant to Step Up For Students President Doug Tuthill, fell in love with working with children from special needs from atop a horse.

Jen Canning, executive assistant to Step Up For Students President Doug Tuthill, fell in love with working with children from special needs from atop a horse.

I did a little research before starting with the organization, so I came to work with a broad knowledge of what we did. I knew Step Up managed two different scholarships: the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship for low-income students and the Personal Learning Scholarships Accounts Scholarship (PLSA) for children with certain special needs. The tax-credit scholarship allows parents to choose between funding private school tuition and fees up to $5,677 and a $500 transportation scholarship to help families get their child to school in a different district. Yep, I did my homework. I am the executive assistant to Step Up President Doug Tuthill after all.

I knew that tens of thousands of young Floridians were currently on a scholarship from the organization, and I knew that first and foremost, Step Up promotes a parent’s right to choose the best form of education for their child, regardless of their income.

Even though I’ve only been with the organization for a brief couple of weeks, I’ve learned so much more about what it is we do here at Step Up. For example, I now know that we are a four out of four stars charity, with a Charity Navigator score of 99.92%. It’s a good feeling to know that I work for a charity that is properly allocating its funds and operating in the best interest of the students!

I’ve also learned that there are many private schools that are as dependent on the Step Up scholarship as their students. Scholars have chosen to attend more than  1,500  partner schools across the state, and on average, Step Up scholars constitute about a quarter of the total enrollment of those schools. Some of these schools cannot afford to operate without our scholarship.

Since joining the Step Up team, I’ve been most excited to learn about the work the Office of Student Learning is doing with our partner schools. Providing scholarships is only the first step to helping children from low-income families succeed. Carol Thomas’ team is working with the schools to develop programs that bridge the gap between families and their children’s educators. This includes an online portal that empowers parents to become more engaged in their child’s education. We’re also fundraising to provide even more wraparound services.

Step Up wasted no time in throwing me into the mix of being a part of this amazing organization. On my second day of work, I sat in on a meeting with a neuroscientist and learned about how the psychology of a child who grew up in poverty is vastly different than that of a child from an affluent family. This fundamental difference could lead to a need of a different type of learning environment for these students. The better we understand this psychology, the better able we are to empower our scholars, their parents, and the schools we work with.

During my second week on the job, I attended a Pastors’ Round Table. This was a gathering of prominent Hispanic church leaders in the Tampa area to discuss our organization, threats against our scholarship, and how it impacts their congregations. We brought along former Step Up scholar Denisha Merriweather to tell her story of how the scholarship provided for her success. We’re excited she’s now an intern at Step Up. We were able to garner tremendous support from the pastors, many of which have church members on our scholarship.

Needless to say, I’m more than excited about my future with Step Up for Students. I have the opportunity of working closely with our marketing team soon and I’m happy to be putting that part of my education to good use. In the future, I hope to work more with the PLSA team because my heart will always be with children with unique needs and ensuring their families that their child has a right to the best possible education.

Jen is the executive assistant at Step Up For Students. She lives on Pass-A-Grille Beach in St Petersburg, and when she’s not working at and learning about Step Up, Jen enjoys open water swimming in the Gulf and cooking homemade meals from scratch.