Tag Archives forK-12 scholarships

Once bullied, now safe, happy, and thriving

Armani Powe, 12, stands tall and proud, happy to be a student at Glades Day School.

By JEFF BARLIS

BELLE GLADE, Fla. – When she’s in class, the look on Armani Powe’s face is solemn, focused. She doesn’t harden her gaze intentionally. It happens naturally.

“When it comes to my grades,” she says, “I get really serious.”

Armani, 12, turns quiet and a little withdrawn when asked about the bullying she endured in second grade at her neighborhood school.

“It makes me all sad just to remember it,” she explains with the distance of several years.

She doesn’t mind telling the story, though, because she’s happy, safe, and thriving now at a private school. A Florida Tax Credit Scholarship from Step Up For Students was the vehicle.

Armani had one bully with a band of two or three other boys who delighted in embarrassing her daily. They mocked her crooked teeth, her clothes, hair, backpack. Anything and everything and nothing.

She admits she was an inviting target.

“Looking back at my little self, I was quiet and nice and always doing my work, studying all the time, reading a book in class, and not talking,” she said. “That’s probably why they picked on me.”

The taunting chipped away at her self-image. The worst was how she felt about her teeth. She kept asking her mom when she could get braces, but they were too expensive.

One day, Armani was crying when her mother, Roline Powe, was called early to pick her up. Armani said she didn’t want to go to school anymore. She showed her mom a red hand print on her face where her bully had just slapped her.

That was it.

Roline had requested meetings before, but school officials never filed reports. They always promised they would handle it.

“They just downplayed everything,” she said. “I went in at least five times.”

She felt a nauseating mix of anger and guilt in her stomach. She couldn’t stop thinking about the braces she couldn’t afford.

“It was the most horrible thing to not be able to give your child the care they need,” she said. “But not only was she teased, she was hit! All because of her appearance.”

Determined to fix the situation herself, Roline went to nearby Glades Day School to see if private school could be an option. Everyone in this small town knows about Glades Day and its reputation for preparing children for college, trades, and agriculture careers.

She was nervous when she went in for a meeting. A friend who sent her daughter to GDS had told Roline the price of one year’s tuition, and she nearly buckled.

“I could only dream,” she said.

But it came true when an administrator told her about the scholarship from Step Up For Students. It gives lower-income families the power to choose the school that best suits their children’s needs.

This school year, the state instituted the HOPE Scholarship to give victims of bullying the option to transfer to another public school or to an approved private school as soon as their scholarship is approved.

Roline is glad to see the new scholarship in place. It might have helped prevent some of the trauma Armani endured in the weeks after she was slapped.

“It was the hardest thing getting through that year,” said Roline, who was then a substitute teacher at the neighborhood middle school and now works as an assistant teacher. “There were times I had to take a day off of work, go there, and monitor without her seeing me. I’d watch the playground from the parking lot. Sometimes I picked her up 10 minutes early.”

“It was a journey. She made it through, but if she had remained there, she probably would have needed some therapy.”

As it turned out, Glades Day School was all Armani needed.

Head of School Amie Pitts, herself a graduate of Glades Day, has carefully crafted a safe space for learning. Character isn’t just emphasized, it’s talked about by the student body on a weekly basis.

“Environment is a very big deal, and this is a different environment,” she said. “Our mission is a safe family environment, and I think we do a very good job. We pride ourselves on family. We see it as a partnership between the home and the school to raise great kids who are successful in life.”

There’s a friendly feeling that swirls through the school buildings along with the strong breeze that pushes from massive Lake Okeechobee to the north. The 30-acre campus is buttressed by cane fields to the south and east, and a sugar mill looms large across the street with smokestacks constantly churning. It’s a reminder of a life in the fields that Roline so badly wants her children to avoid.

It didn’t take long for Armani to adjust. She quickly went from tentative to curious about her new school. Soon, she was talking to others without feeling scared. They were small steps.

Every Wednesday, students wear orange shirts that say “Bullying” or “Cyberbullying” in a circle with a slash through it. Every Friday, the student body gathers to talk and lift each other up.

“We talk about kindness first,” Armani said. “People talk about what we do and should do in the world. We get it right.”

By the time Armani started her second year, she was joined by older brother Lorenzo and younger brother Shemar.

“It was the best decision I could have made for my family,” Roline said. “And for Armani, it was a game-changer.”

Roline said Glades Day has made her a better, more attentive parent. She doesn’t just help with homework anymore, she has a presence at the school. Everyone knows her as “Momma Powe.”

“She is extremely engaged,” Pitts said. “She’s here every day. She’s at every single sporting event, comes to all the meetings, reads to her son in the media center. She wants better for her kids, and they’re doing very well.”

Armani is a solid B-student striving for more. She asks for help whenever she struggles with a subject. She wants to be a veterinarian someday.

She feels safe now, settled. She has learned how to be brave and confident.

When she looks back at her little self from second grade, she feels a profound difference that goes beyond her long limbs and strong shoulders. She’s comfortable in her own skin and doesn’t worry about her appearance.

Braces fixed her teeth a couple of years ago, and she must be one of the only pre-teens around who’s excited to get them put on for a second time.

“I have a big, cheesy smile,” she said. “My friends love when I smile.”

She does it all the time. Just not when she’s focused in class.

About Glades Day School

Now in its 53rd year, GDS moved from Pahokee to Belle Glade in 1973. The school is accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools. Teachers have an average of 20 years of experience. Nineteen GDS employees are graduates. There are 257 K-12 students, including 94 on Step Up For Students Scholarships. The school has a thriving Agri-science program that’s tied to the Future Farmers of America and features welding, gardening, even a hog pen to train students in Grades 7-12. There are also four computer labs and smartboards in several classrooms. Dual enrollment, Advanced Placement and virtual school courses are offered. The Stanford 10 test is administered every March. Annual tuition is $7,800 for K-5; $8,800 for 6-8; and $9,800 for 9-12 with financial aid available. Transportation is available as far east as Royal Palm Beach and as far west as Clewiston.

Jeff Barlis can be reached at jbarlis@sufs.org.

Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company makes $4 million contribution to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program

By ASHLEY ZARLE

Step Up For Students announced recently a $4 million contribution to the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program from Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company (UPCIC), a wholly owned subsidiary of Universal Insurance Holdings, Inc.

The $4 million donation will fund 565 K-12 scholarships for the 2018-19 school year, so lower-income children can attend the school that best meets their learning needs. This is the second year that UPCIC has partnered with Step Up For Students and has contributed a total of $6 million to the scholarship program.

“We are grateful for corporate donors like Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company who are helping to provide educational opportunities for Florida schoolchildren,” said Joe Pfountz, chief financial officer of Step Up For Students. “The company’s generosity is crucial to the work our team does and shows just how much they really care about Florida’s kids and its future.”

On Dec. 4 Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company announced a $4 million contribution to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are UPCIC’s Regional VP of Marketing-Northeast/Midwest David Ahern, UPCIC’s Spokesperson and NFL Hall of Famer Dan Marino, UPCIC’s COO Steve Donaghy, UPCIC’s Vice President of Marketing Stacey Tomko, UPCIC’s Regional VP of Marketing-Southeast Derek Heard, UPCIC’s VP of Corporate Development & Strategy Rob Luther, and St. Joan of Arc School Principal Caroline Roberts. They are joined by several students from St. Joan of Arc School who are benefiting from the scholarship.

On Dec. 4 Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company announced a $4 million contribution to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are UPCIC’s Regional VP of Marketing-Northeast/Midwest David Ahern, UPCIC’s Spokesperson and NFL Hall of Famer Dan Marino, Step Up For Students CFO Joe Pfountz, UPCIC’s COO Steve Donaghy, UPCIC’s Vice President of Marketing Stacey Tomko, UPCIC’s Regional VP of Marketing-Southeast Derek Heard, UPCIC’s VP of Corporate Development & Strategy Rob Luther, and St. Joan of Arc School Principal Caroline Roberts. They are joined by several students from St. Joan of Arc School who are benefiting from the scholarship.

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

“Universal is committed to giving back and empowering the communities that it serves to accelerate community opportunities and build the foundation for the next generation of business leaders,” said Sean Downes, chairman and chief executive officer for Universal. Dan Marino, UPCIC spokesperson, National Football League hall of famer and former Miami Dolphins quarterback made a special appearance and spoke to the schoolchildren at an event on Dec. 4 hosted by St. Joan of Arc School in Boca Raton, Florida.

“Having options and choice in where you go to school is important and I’m excited to see so many students here today who have access to the learning environment that best suits their individual needs,” said Marino. “We know that the education you receive will help propel you to do great things.”

For the 2018-19 school year, Step Up For Students is serving more than 98,500 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued at up to $6,519 per student for kindergarten through fifth grade, $6,815 for sixth through eighth grade, and $7,111 for ninth through 12th grade. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Caldwell Trust Company celebrates 25th anniversary and continued support of Step Up For Students

By ASHLEY ZARLE

Caldwell Trust Company, an independent trust company with more than 25 years of investment experience and one billion dollars in assets under management recently announced a $30,000 contribution to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program for the 2018-19 school year.

Caldwell Trust has been a partner of Step Up For Students since 2011 and has contributed a total of $220,000 towards the scholarship program. The company’s contribution over the years has funded 40  K-12 scholarships so lower-income children can attend the school that best meets their learning needs.

“At Caldwell Trust, we consider it our civic duty and privilege to contribute to our community both as a company and as individuals,” said R.G. “Kelly” Caldwell, Jr., president and CEO of Caldwell Trust Company.  “We are proud to partner with Step Up For Students and support the unique learning needs of Florida schoolchildren.”

Caldwell Trust is also celebrating its 25th Anniversary this year and Step Up scholars and parents from Epiphany Cathedral School in Venice, which serves more than 250 Step Up students, wanted to thank the company for its support.

On Nov. 29, they visited the company headquarters and presented 25 handwritten thank you cards to Caldwell Trust associates in recognition of the milestone anniversary. Students, parents, and Epiphany Cathedral administrators had the opportunity to share their personal experience about the importance and impact of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship program.

“Our school wouldn’t be what it is today without Step Up For Students,” said M.C. Heffner, principal of Epiphany Cathedral. “We are so thankful that these deserving students can attend our school, who without the scholarship wouldn’t be able to.”

On Nov. 29 Caldwell Trust Company celebrated its’ cumulative contribution of $220,000 to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are Epiphany Cathedral School Principal M.C. Heffner, Caldwell Trust’s President and CEO R.G. “Kelly” Caldwell, Jr., and Step Up For Student’s Development Officer Cheryl Audus. They are joined by several students from Epiphany Cathedral who are benefiting from the scholarship.

On Nov. 29 Caldwell Trust Company celebrated its cumulative contribution of $220,000 to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are Epiphany Cathedral School Principal M.C. Heffner, Caldwell Trust’s President and CEO R.G. “Kelly” Caldwell, Jr., and
Step Up For Student’s Development Officer Cheryl Audus. They are joined by several students from Epiphany Cathedral who are benefiting from the scholarship.

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

 “We are thrilled that Caldwell Trust has once again committed to helping us provide educational choices for students who otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity,” said Doug Tuthill, Step Up For Students president. “We are grateful for our partnership and for all they are doing to give back to their community.”

For the 2018-19 school year, Step Up For Students is serving more than 98,500 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued at up to $6,519 per student for kindergarten through fifth grade, $6,815 for sixth through eighth grade, and $7,111 for ninth through 12th grade. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Globe Life makes $25,000 contribution to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program

By ASHLEY ZARLE

Globe Life, the top volume issuer of ordinary individual life insurance policies in the United States, announced Dec. 17 a $25,000 contribution to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program for the 2018-19 school year.

This is the first time that Globe Life has supported Step Up For Students. The company’s contribution will fund three K-12 scholarships so lower-income children can attend the school that best meets their learning needs.

“Since 1951, Globe Life has believed in giving back to the communities in which we live and work,” said Corey Jones, Senior Vice President of Digital Marketing and Branding for Globe Life. “We strive to create opportunities to be a source of good to those around us and we are proud to support Step Up For Students to provide education opportunities for children in our community.”

Corey Jones, Globe Life Senior Vice President of Digital Marketing and Branding, right, presents David Bryant, Step Up For Students development officer, with a check for $25,000 which will fund three scholarships for lower-income Florida schoolchildren to attend the school of their choice through the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. .

Corey Jones, Globe Life Senior Vice President of Digital Marketing and Branding, right, presents David Bryant, Step Up For Students development officer, with a check for $25,000 which will fund three scholarships for lower-income Florida schoolchildren to attend the school of their choice through the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program
.

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

 “We are honored to welcome Globe Life as a supporter of our mission to help lower-income Florida families access schools that best fit their children’s unique learning needs,” said Doug Tuthill, Step Up For Students president. “We are grateful for their generosity and their commitment to giving back to their community.”

For the 2018-19 school year, Step Up For Students is serving more than 98,500 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued at up to $6,519 per student for kindergarten through fifth grade, $6,815 for sixth through eighth grade, and $7,111 for ninth through 12th grade. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Choice scholarship provided brothers an extended family

Preston, Linda, and Tyler McDonald.

By JEFF BARLIS

CLEARWATER, Fla. – Tyler McDonald, 19, and his brother Preston, 18, stand out in a crowd. Tall and athletic, their breezy, no-worries attitudes are as evident as the sparkle in their hazel-brown eyes.

They are All-American, boy-next-door types, the highest of achievers who say they wouldn’t be where they are now – Princeton and Duke, respectively – had it not been for Clearwater Central Catholic High School and the education choice scholarship that made it possible to attend.

Going to CCC was about much more than great academics.

They initially were raised in a comfortable middle-class home, never wanting. Everything changed seven years ago when their father left. The divorce was bitter and protracted. Their mother, Linda, would cry in her closet.

“She may think she hid it, but we could tell,” Tyler recounted with a twinge of sadness. “The toughest thing was there was nothing we could do about it.”

A couple of years before the divorce, Linda had stopped working as a nurse to take care of her mother, who was left paralyzed after an operation. During and after the divorce, she felt the sting of an extended unemployment she never planned. She needed a job with more flexibility and became a substitute teacher at the neighborhood middle school to be closer to her sons.

But it wasn’t enough. The three moved to smaller and smaller homes. The power and water were turned off on more than one occasion. Food shopping was for necessities only. Clothes shopping was once a year when the sales were on. Sports shoes and equipment had to last two years instead of one.

As they rallied around each other, help arrived in the form of a private school family that embraced and lifted them.

 

Sunlight cascades through the north-facing windows of the administration building at CCC. When visitors enter, they see the cheery, bespectacled face of front office manager Mary Weber. Her unofficial title is Director of First Impressions, and it only takes a moment to see why – she knows every one of the 500-plus students by name.

A warm, family feeling permeates campus.

That’s how it was for Tyler and Preston, when they each visited as eighth-graders and spent shadow days sitting in on a full slate of classes. CCC students grabbed every chance to talk to Tyler, asking as many questions about him as they answered.

“I shadowed at a nearby district school right before that,” he said. “It felt like I was just watching class. No one talked to me. It was a big difference.”

A year later, Preston got the same vibe at CCC.

“People were telling me the good stuff so that I would come,” he said. “It was really welcoming.”

 

Tyler, Preston, and Linda are a tight unit, a triumphant trio. They joke, tease, and finish each other’s sentences.

Born in the Bahamas and raised in Florida, Linda has a light accent and a modest, girlish giggle. It comes over her like a blush when she talks about her sons’ accomplishments.

After the divorce, anger and hurt were common but never affected Tyler or Preston at school. Linda had always pushed them gently to strive for straight A’s, and when they got the taste for it, they never looked back.

When it was time to choose a high school, there were public school magnets and International Baccalaureate (IB) programs in the mix. But it was the family feeling at CCC that made such an impression on those first visits – for the boys and for Linda.

“I remember going into (Director of Enrollment Tara Shea McLaughlin’s) office, knowing Tyler had really fallen in love with the school,” Linda said. “I was in tears because I didn’t know how I was going to afford this.”

McLaughlin spoke with the finance department. The school offered significant tuition assistance, but it wasn’t enough. They also helped Linda apply for the Step Up For Students scholarship that empowers low-income families to choose a private school.

It still didn’t cover everything.

“It was important to come up with a monthly payment that was not overwhelming, so she wasn’t in a panic every month,” said McLaughlin, herself an alumnus of CCC. “Any of us could be in the same situation. We saw the potential in those boys, so we needed to make it happen.”

McLaughlin also opened the school closet of gently used uniforms to Linda and got CCC’s uniform company to donate shoes to all of the school’s Step Up scholars.

Tyler McDonald’s senior portrait.

Preston McDonald’s senior portrait.

“It’s hard to compute the things they’ve done for my kids,” Linda said, recalling how she sometimes had to send Tyler to the finance office with a late check and an apology. “They were an amazing group of people. They nurtured my kids.”

Wanting to show her gratitude, Linda threw herself into volunteering. Despite working full-time as a public school teacher, she sold tickets and concessions at sporting events and helping with the school’s annual fundraising gala.

“Every CCC parent volunteers 15 hours, but Linda was in the hundreds of hours,” McLaughlin said. “She was everywhere.”

Tyler and Preston were enormously popular. They were sports stars who shined even brighter in the classroom. Tyler was valedictorian with an Ivy League future. Preston graduated at the top of his class with a full IB diploma.

“We’re beyond proud,” McLaughlin said, radiating like a parent. “We’re over the moon that they came here, and they will always be part of the CCC family.”

 

Today, Tyler is a sophomore football player majoring in economics at Princeton (which he chose over Harvard and Yale). He’s pondering careers in investment banking, private equity, corporate real estate, and management consulting.

In his first year at Duke, Preston wants to study computer programming and software engineering while getting a business certificate.

The boys stay in touch with each other mostly via text, at least three times a week. They’ve always been competitive and love to verbally spar over their IQs and now their colleges’ rankings. When they returned for the holiday, they cherished their time at home, together again.

Thanksgiving used to evoke dark memories.

“Right after the divorce, splitting every holiday was weird,” Tyler said. “Thanksgiving is supposed to be about family, but it’ll never be the same.”

This year, Tyler took part in “Friendsgiving,” a potluck set up by 15-20 CCC grads that’s been going on for three years. There was turkey, ham, green bean casserole, mashed potatoes, sweet potato casserole … all the trimmings.

“It started my senior year, just to hang out,” he said. “But it’s still running two years out of high school.”

“I don’t think we’d have that big a group or that cohesive a group if we had gone to any other high school.”

Indeed, after going to CCC, family will never be the same.

About Clearwater Central Catholic High School

Founded in 1962 with 96 students and seven staff members, the school graduated its first class of 26 seniors two years later. CCC, which is overseen by the Diocese of St. Petersburg, has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as a National School of Excellence. The 40-acre campus is a short walk from an inlet of Tampa Bay. The school is accredited by AdvancED and has 541 students, including 75 on Step Up For Students scholarships. CCC is an IB School with a 65 percent award rate in the full IB Diploma Program. The school also offers dual enrollment courses with St. Petersburg College as well as Advanced Placement (AP) Program courses for college credit. The PSAT test is administered to ninth and 10th graders. Tuition is $14,950 annually, and $12,400 for a family affiliated with a local Catholic parish. In 2017-18, CCC provided more than $425,000 in income-based tuition assistance to more than 25 percent of its families.

Jeff Barlis can be reached at jbarlis@sufs.org.

Calling all Florida Tax Credit Scholarship renewal families: Applications now open

By JUDITH THOMAS

Florida Tax Credit (income-based) Scholarship parents, we have great news for you. 

 You can now apply for a scholarship for the 2019-20 school year. You are a renewal family if your child is using a Florida Tax Credit Scholarship for the 2018-19 school year.  

 Renewal families will have processing priority until Jan. 31, 2019. If you apply on or after Feb. 1, 2019, you lose your priority status over new applications. 

Apply here.

 Don’t delay. Applications are processed on a first-come, first-served basis in the order all required documents are received. Funds are limited, so the sooner you apply and submit all supporting documents, the faster and more likely you are to secure your child’s scholarship for the upcoming school year. 

 Processing times vary depending on the volume of applications received and can take up to eight weeks in some cases. Check your email for more information or use the chat on our website to contact us. Watch this helpful application checklist video today:


 

If you’re currently waitlisted for the Florida Tax Credit (income-based) Scholarship, make sure you’re on the interest list to be notified when we’re opening applications for new families for the 2019-20 school year here.

Adopted siblings thrive in private school after severe neglect in early childhood

Sobel family.

Editor’s note: To mark National Adoption Awareness Month, we highlight the tax credit scholarship that serves children who are or were in Florida’s foster care system.

By JEFF BARLIS

INVERNESS, Fla. – There is no hiding from the nightmarish stories of his early childhood, but Diego Cornelius is grateful to have forgotten most of the details.

Some things he can’t forget, like the time he smelled smoke in their mobile home and woke everyone, saving them, before all of their possessions burned. Or the time he fell from a boat without a life vest, and nearly drowned before his mom jumped in.

Most of the time, he and his sisters were left alone. Their father was gone, their mother addicted to a variety of drugs. Her extended family and boyfriend had lengthy criminal records.

“He always had a struggle to survive,” his adoptive mother said.

These days, 13-year-old Diego is grateful for a lot of things: his younger sisters, Alyssa and Bianca, who look to him as a role model; his former foster parents, who adopted them; and the school choice scholarship that’s allowed them to attend the Catholic school that has embraced them all as family.

X X X

As a foster mom to more than 100 children over the last 22 years, Patricia Sobel knows something about the importance of a caring, structured environment.

That’s why she lit up when she learned about the Step Up For Students scholarship that empowers low-income families to send their kids to the private school of their choice. The scholarship also serves foster children and adopted children who were in Florida’s foster care system.

“I was in shock,” she recalled. “Shock, for two days. I couldn’t believe they were actually eligible for this free education. What a gift!”

When Diego, Alyssa, and Bianca entered Patricia’s life, she realized they were special. Six years ago, they were rescued from a life of severe neglect.

“They were living in a drug house,” Patricia said, her low, soft voice punctuated with warm emotion. “They were in a garage with no running water or electricity. Their teeth were blackened. Their heads were filled with lice. They were so filthy, they had to be bathed at the police station.”

Diego remembers the lice crawling under the tight waves of his reddish-blond hair.

“We had to put mayonnaise in our hair and wear caps over it,” he said. “I still think about that. It means someone is there to care for you and make sure you’re healthy.”

That was just the start. Diego needed a surgical procedure on his eye, and all three children needed counseling and dental work.

For kids who had so little growing up, even small gestures made a big impression.

“If I’m hungry, I just go ask and they ask me what I want,” Diego said. “They make sure we don’t starve. They make sure to protect us. My mom likes to lock the doors each night and make sure the windows are closed.”

“They love us.”

It took time for Diego and his sisters to go from “Pat” and “Chuck” to “Mom” and “Dad,” but now the love is mutual.

X X X

The children have gotten used to the same love and care at Saint John Paul II Catholic School in nearby Lecanto.

“I like the teachers, all of them,” said Alyssa, 11. “They’re kind and they help us.”

Bianca, 10, enjoys learning about religion, something else that was missing in their early years.

None of the siblings attended preschool, and Diego still feels the effects of being behind academically. His biological mother took him to kindergarten for the first week but never brought him back. He doesn’t know why.

When Pat and Chuck sent him to their neighborhood school, Diego was a 6-year-old in kindergarten alongside 5-year-old Alyssa. They remain classmates today.

After a couple of years living in the Sobels’ four-bedroom foster home in Tampa, everything fell into place for adoption. The children’s biological parents no longer had rights to custody. Despite their troubled past, the siblings were vibrant, compassionate, and healthy.

A few months later, Patricia and Charles moved everyone north from bustling Tampa to the rural rolling hills of Inverness to start Don Bosco’s Children’s Home, named after John Bosco, a Catholic saint who dedicated his life to helping disadvantaged youth. The nonprofit had purchased three houses and the lush, tranquil land they sat on. It needed a lot of work – a new roof here, a new air conditioning system there, paint and landscaping everywhere.

Patricia Sobel is executive director of Don Bosco’s Children’s Home in Inverness, Fla.

The Sobels know how to rehabilitate.

Their organization is still getting off the ground. Their goal is to find foster parents to live in the other two houses, to use their home as a blueprint. The need is large and growing.

“I get calls every day to place kids in foster care,” Patricia said.

The number of children entering Florida’s foster care system has risen sharply, and a recent study by the University of South Florida showed a tie to the opioid crisis.

“I’m going to continue taking more children,” Patricia said. “One thing I try to do is get them all in the Step Up For Students program.”

In the three years they’ve lived in Inverness, they’ve sent all 13 of their children to Saint John Paul II. Patricia has fond memories of her biological daughter, Adrienne, attending Catholic schools. More importantly, she feels a small school with a more individually tailored environment is best for her foster and adopted children.

X X X

Earlier this year as a sixth-grader at SJP2, Diego got in trouble for plagiarizing a paper. His teacher was ready to give him an F. The principal intervened.

“He wasn’t trying to do it on purpose, he just had never been taught the proper way,” said Lee Sayago, himself an energetic newcomer at the school.

Diego was upset. Getting all A’s and making the Principal’s List was a borderline obsession from the time he first attended an assembly and saw his high-achieving classmates receive special recognition.

Bianca, Alyssa, and Diego Cornelius are all smiles at Saint John Paul II Catholic School in Lecanto, Fla.

He got a second chance and beamed with confidence when he pulled Sayago aside to show him his new grade – 97, the highest score of anyone in Grades 6-8.

“It could have been a negative experience,” Sayago said, the corners of his eyes creased with pride. “But the way he handled it was amazing.”

Diego is in the midst of a growth spurt. He loves sports that involve running and lifts weights regularly in hopes of getting “six-pack” abs. After a couple of years of falling just short, he’s made all A’s.

“It’s amazing what a little nourishment and love can do,” Patricia said. “It comes from the home and the school, and then they just grow and blossom.”

About Saint John Paul II Catholic School

Opened in 1985 as part of the Archdiocese of St. Petersburg, St. John Paul II is the only Catholic school in rural Citrus County. The school serves 205 K-8 students, including 81 on Step Up For Students scholarships. SJP2 is a candidate school for the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme and is pursuing authorization as an IB World School. The school administers the MAP Growth test three times a year as well as the Terra Nova Spring test. Annual tuition is $6,645 for K-5 and $6,945 for 6-8.

Jeff Barlis can be reached at jbarlis@sufs.org.

Here’s your chance to thank a donor with your own video

By ROGER MOONEY

Mayra Gallardo can sing solo in front of as many as 2,000 worshipers at her church and not break a sweat, but when she sat recently to make a video, thanking donors and supporters for the opportunity her Step Up For Students scholarship has given her, well, different story.

It was an important message Mayra wanted to deliver, and she needed a few minutes to prepare. She rehearsed what she was going to say, making sure to hit all the notes, so to speak.

And she did.

She nailed it.

Mayra, a high school student, tells viewers she loves her school, is doing great in her classes and plans on attending college.

It took her 14 seconds to say thank you to some of the most important people in her life – the donors who help make her scholarship possible.

Mayra’s video is coming soon to all of Step Up For Students’ social media platforms. This Thanksgiving season, Step Up is asking scholarship students or their parents or both to thank the donors for their educational opportunity.

These do not have to be long – 15 to 20 seconds tops.

Hold your phone horizontally while recording and send them to us at social@sufs.org. We will select some to share with our donors and on social media.

If you need help, here are some ideas to get you started creating your own message:

Start your video by introducing yourself with your first name and the grade that you’re in. Share something special about your experience on scholarship or the school you attend. It can be your favorite subject, your career path, or the unique experience your school provides. Donors to Step Up For Students not only fund scholarships, but also programs and services that serve your family and school. All of these help our scholarship students be successful, so our donors are some of your biggest fans. Give a quick word of thanks to the donors and supporters, smile, and have fun!

Parents can get their 15 seconds of fame, too. Parents, share your story about how having a scholarship for your child has made a difference.

Step Up routinely thanks the donors and supporters who enabled us to become the top school choice nonprofit in the country. But a “thank you” from someone whose life has improved because of these donations is the most powerful message of all.

That really nails it.

Oh, and if you have not done so already, be sure to “like” us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Marketing Communications Manager Roger Mooney can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Step Up For Students ranked 31st out of 100 charities in the nation

By ROGER MOONEY

Step Up For Students added another recognition to its growing list of honors as it serves some of Florida’s most disadvantaged children.

Step Up For Students is now ranked 31st out of 100 on the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s list of America’s Favorite Charities, the magazine announced Tuesday. Last year, Step Up was ranked No. 42.

“We are honored by this ranking,” said Step Up President Doug Tuthill, “and we are grateful to our donors who share our vision to enable children in the state of Florida to receive the best education possible.”

Step Up, a nonprofit scholarship funding organization serving Florida schoolchildren, is expected to help 125,000 children during the 2018-19 school year with four scholarships – the Florida Tax Credit scholarship for children in lower-income families, the Gardiner Scholarship for children with certain special needs, the Hope Scholarship for children who are bullied in public school, the Reading Scholarship Accounts program, to assist struggling readers in third through fifth grades three. The Hope and Reading scholarships are new for this school year.

With the support of about 250 corporate donors, Step Up raised more than $500 million in 2017.

The Chronicle’s ranking is based on an organization’s cash support, focusing exclusively on “the fundraising of cause-driven nonprofits,” according to the Chronicle’s story published Oct. 30.

It is designed to offer a better understanding of trends that influence donations from individuals as well as the increasing value of foundation gifts to charities. The idea is to deliver a clear financial representation of the top fundraising organizations.

“The recognition of being in the Chronicle’s top 100 charities places Step Up For Students in an esteemed group of nonprofits,” said Anne Francis, Step Up’s vice president of development. “Our ranking is a measure of our donors’ commitment to our mission of providing educational opportunities for under-served children. It is a ranking that I recognize as both earned and humbling.

“The importance of the ranking is both in the reflection of what our donors have contributed to place us among the Top 100 and what the future can hold for Step Up with the increased awareness of our organization and mission that the ranking brings.”

Step Up continues to rank among the top nonprofits nationwide with this latest ranking.

The organization recently received a four-star rating for the seventh consecutive year from Charity Navigator, the nation’s top charity evaluator. That ranking was based on financial performance, accountability and transparency. Only 4 percent of charities have earned a four-star rating for seven consecutive years.

Step Up is recognized as a Platinum Charity by GuideStar. The scholarship funding organization is also ranked 26th of the 100 largest charities by Forbes for the last fiscal year.

Step Up was also voted the top nonprofit in Florida in 2017 in the education category by the Tampa Bay Business Journal and one of the best places to work in Jacksonville by the Jacksonville Business Journal.

Roger Mooney can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

 

 

Scholarship helps smiles return for student and her parents

Editor’s note: This story was originally posted on redefinED on February 10, 2017.

By JEFF BARLIS

Maria and Marcos Verciano will never forget the anguish over their daughter’s struggles in third and fourth grade. That’s why they’re so grateful for the scholarship that changed their lives.

At first it was the D’s and F’s on Hadassa’s report cards that raised their concern. Then the poor progress reports, all of the meetings at their neighborhood school in Destin, Florida, being told Hadassa wasn’t on track to make the next grade level – it all added up to a serious strain on the family.

Hadassa’s attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis didn’t do much to change her path, either.

Hadassa Verciano, 12, has improved her academics at Rocky Bayou Christian School in Niceville, Fla. “It’s way easier to learn,” she said. “If you don’t understand something the teachers explain it really well.”

Hadassa Verciano, 12, has improved her academics at Rocky Bayou Christian School in Destin, Fla. “It’s way easier to learn,” she said. “If you don’t understand something the teachers explain it really well.”

“They just set her apart and gave her more time to do the tests, but nothing more than that,” Maria said. “It was so sad for me, for her dad and for her, because she felt different from the other students. She felt like she was not accepted.”

“It was kind of overwhelming to think that she wouldn’t make it to fourth and fifth grade, that this was going to be her life forever. It was a very bad feeling that she was always behind.”

When Hadassa’s normally bright spirit and enthusiasm for school turned to dejection, her parents knew they had to make a change.

A Step Up For Students scholarship empowered them to do it.

The couple had always dreamed of sending Hadassa to a private school, but with Marcos’ work installing pavers and Maria’s job managing a beach house, they could never afford it. At their small Brazilian church, they found out about Rocky Bayou Christian School, a place that caters to all manner of students with different educational needs.

At Rocky Bayou’s Destin campus, principal Joe Quilit told Maria about the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship, which helps lower-income families afford tuition. She applied, but it was too late in the school year. All of the scholarships had been awarded. Continue reading

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