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Of baby supplies, care packages for soldiers and feeding the needy: The tale of one student’s charity

By ROGER MOONEY

After he helped deliver food to an orphanage in the Dominican Republic in late February, Jack Figueredo helped bring more food to five impoverished families in a nearby town.

The next day, Jack and his mom held a baby shower in another part of the Dominican for 35 financially disadvantaged moms-to-be, arranged by the Rawlings Foundation, a Christian mission and outreach organization.

After the women received their bags filled with much-needed baby supplies, finished their lunches and polished off the sheet cake, Jack took time to reflect and was, in his words, “shocked” at what he witnessed during his two days in the country.

The poverty. The need for food and supplies. The unbridled joy of those he helped.

Jack and Helen Figueredo at the baby shower in the Dominican Republic.

“We did so much, and yet I wanted to do so much more,” he said. “As soon as we came back to America, I hit the ground running because I want to help all these people.”

So, Jack has plans for a farmer’s market in Miami-Dade County, where he will help deliver fresh produce to low-income families. And he is organizing a campaign to send care packages to members of the armed forces in Afghanistan. He is currently securing permits so he can help feed and clothe the homeless in some of the poorest neighborhoods in Miami and Homestead.

The baby shower went so well, there are plans for another, this one in Venezuela.

It should be noted that Jack is 16 and finishing his sophomore year at Miami’s Westwood Christian School, a private K-12 school that he and his brother Jonas, who recently graduated, attend with the help of Florida Tax Credit Scholarships.

Managed by Step Up For Students, the scholarship enables lower-income families to send their children to private schools.

Helen and Frank Figueredo qualified after the collapse of the real estate market in 2008 ruined their real estate business.

Westwood provided Jack and Jonas with a quality education in a religious setting. The real estate collapse showed the brothers what life is like for those struggling to get by.

Their parents no longer owned Porsches, and they no longer shopped at high-end stores.

Even during the family’s financial hardship, Helen made the boys pick one wrapped present under the Christmas tree to donate to a needy child. And at Thanksgiving and Easter, the family piled into the car Frank bought for less than $90 at a police auction and made their way to Miami to deliver sandwiches to the homeless who congregate near downtown.

It was part of Helen’s grand lesson to her children: Material things don’t matter. People do.

“The only way these kids are going to appreciate what they had was by seeing what life could be like if they didn’t have much and to instill in them that desire to always want to share, always want to give back, to put humans over material stuff, life over material stuff,” Helen said.

Jack delivering food to impoverished families in the Dominican Republic.

Looking back, Jack said the family trips to feed the homeless were “a great experience.”

“It broke my heart to see a lot of people like this,” Jack said. “I wanted to do something on my own to help them.”

So, Jack decided when he got older, he was going to organize his own charity – Socks and Sandwiches.

That goal became reality last September when Jack started Kids United Foundation. There are five members on the board of directors – Jack and four high school seniors, including Jonas.

“I thought it fit perfectly. Kids helping kids because I’m a kid,” Jack said.

The name was changed because Jack wants to help as many people as possible. And, because it takes time to obtain the permits needed to work with the homeless.


Jack didn’t want to wait. He was upset last summer when he was too young to travel to the Dominican with Helen and Jonas on a mission trip sponsored by the First Baptist Church of Westwood Lakes. Jack was 15, and the minimum age was 16.

“I was kind of bummed,” he said. “This was one of the main reasons I started my own charity. I wanted to help in a way where my age would not be an issue. The only way to do that is if I started it, I did, I created it and I was the boss.”

After hearing Helen’s stories about the extreme poverty she and Jonas encountered on the mission, Jack decided to act.

He came up with the idea of a baby shower after Helen told him of all the pregnant women she saw walking around barefoot and all the small children she saw barely clothed.

Jack filling bags with baby supplies for the baby shower.

They organized a fundraiser Valentine’s Day 2019 at the Actors’ Playhouse at the Miracle Theater in Coral Gables. Kids United received a percentage of the ticket sales. They raised $7,000.

“It was a very successful fundraiser for our first one,” Jack said.

That enabled Kids United to put together gift bags for each of the 35 expectant mothers filled with $72 worth of diapers, bottles and baby clothes.

It also allowed them to buy food for the children in the orphanage and for five additional families in the Dominican.

Jack’s next move was the join the Consortium for a Healthier Miami-Dade, an organization committed to promoting a healthy lifestyle and disease prevention. He was added to the Children’s Issues and Oral Health Committee.

At one of the meetings, Jack suggested a farmer’s market in low-income areas to help children who are not getting enough nutrition in their diet.

The idea was a hit. The question: Who would spearhead the campaign?

“I can do it,” Jack said.

Kids United partnered with Farm Share, a nonprofit that delivers fresh food to needy families and individuals in Florida. In October, Farm Fresh donated 2,800 pounds of produce to Kids United, which then distributed it during a harvest festival at Tropical Park in Miami.

The plan was to hold a farmer’s market four times a year, but the shutdown because of the coronavirus put that plan on hold. It also canceled another dinner theater fundraiser.

Still, Jack’s charity is forging ahead.

With the help of his godfather, Romy Comargo, Jack started H.E.R.O. – Honoring Every Ranger Overseas.

Romy, Helen’s cousin, was a Chief Warrant Officer 3 with the Special Forces. While serving in Afghanistan in 2008, he was shot on the back of the neck and paralyzed from the neck down.

Romy and his wife, Gaby, have since started the Stay in Step Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Recovery Center in Tampa. Stay in Step provides exercise programs for patients both military and civilian with spinal cord injuries and neurological disorders.

H.E.R.O will send care packages containing comfort food, socks and paper stationary to soldiers overseas. The stationary is so the soldiers can correspond with schoolchildren from the Miami area. Kids United is in the process of contacting schools in that area for volunteers to be pen pals.

Gaby Camargo is Venezuelan. She told Jack that she and her husband would help fund the trip if the next Kids United baby shower was held in Venezuela.

The coronavirus has placed a temporary hold on Jack’s idea for Seniors vs. Seniors trivia, where high school seniors compete against residents at the Allegro Senior Living facility in Dadeland.

The moms-to-be at the baby shower.

Originally, Helen advised her son to stick with one charitable endeavor.

“We want to help people, but we don’t want to be committed to one thing,” Jack said. “That’s why we’re committed to such a wide variety of events, and we want to do what no one else is doing.”

Helen also impressed the importance of education on her sons. Both are top-of-the-class students at Westwood and members of the National Honor Society.

Jonas is a finalist for the Silver Knights Award. Held annually by the Miami Herald, the awards go to students who have high grades while making significant contributions to their schools and communities. Jonas, who holds a second-degree black belt in taekwondo, teaches self-defense to Westwood students in grades kindergarten through third. He is headed to the University of Miami with plans to become a lawyer.

Jack is following the same path as Jonas.

No one wants to be poor, Helen said. No one wants to see their business collapse and the savings disappear because of a downward turn of the economy.

But, out of their struggle grew a desire from Jonas and Jack to help those less fortunate.

“We are getting Kids United Foundation off the ground,” Jack said, “but we are barely scratching the surface of what we want to do.”

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.