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A different way of learning gives Gardiner scholar the academic LIFT he needs

By ROGER MOONEY

MIAMI LAKES, Fla. – Joshua Sandoval sat at a table inside the LIFT Educational Academy and, with a laser-like focus, wrote in his journal. The topic: What was special about the classroom?

He was on his third sentence.

His mother, Nilsa Roberts, sat two rooms away, watching Joshua on one of four monitors hanging from a wall in the office of Dr. Fabian Redler, the school’s director and founder.

Roberts was, in a word, amazed.

She did not see a child with behavioral issues, as one school labeled her son. She did not see a child who struggled to complete assignments, as some of Joshua’s former teachers complained. Instead, she saw a student quietly going about his task.

“This is amazing,” Roberts said as she stared at her son’s image on the screen. “I’ve never seen him like this. He’s so focused.”

Yes, Joshua, 12, comes with learning challenges.

Joshua and his mom, Nilsa Roberts.

At three months, he was diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis complex, a genetic disorder where the body produces benign tumors. It is a rare disease as defined by the National Organization of Rare Diseases and qualifies Joshua for a Gardiner Scholarship, which is run by Step Up For Students.

Joshua’s tumors are in his brain. They cause daily seizures. The medication he takes makes him fidgety. Staying focused can be a struggle.

But, Roberts said, her son does not have behavioral issues, and he is not, as one teacher told her, unteachable.

Joshua speaks two languages – English and Spanish. He is an avid reader and uses an extensive vocabulary for his age. He knows all the words to all his favorite songs. He interacts well with other children.

He plays right field on his Little League team.

“What I know with Joshua is he’s very smart, and he learns different from other kids,” Roberts said.

She knew if she could find the right school, the right setting, Joshua would thrive. She spent a lot of time looking.

Joshua is in the sixth grade. LIFT is his seventh school.

“Finally,” Roberts said, “we found the place.”

No holding back
The LIFT Educational Academy is part of What’s On Your Mind, a psychology, tutoring and brain fitness center that has three south Florida locations, including one in Miami Lakes, Florida, the same town where Roberts and her family live.

Established by Redler, 20 years ago as a psychology and brain fitness center for children, What’s On Your Mind is well-known for aiding children in developing the brain skills essential for learning and surpassing their abilities through their trademarked programs.

The two decades of consistent progress has resulted in the establishment of LIFT Educational Academy four years ago, after parents urged Redler to start a much-needed unconventional school.

LIFT has 12 students ranging from first to 12th grade. Redler said the school could expand to 24 students.

New students obtain a psychoeducational evaluation to determine cognitive deficiencies in the skills involved in learning – attention, memory, visual processing and processing speed. They receive brain-based exercises to strengthen those areas.

The exercises are tailored to each student and integrated in their English Language Arts and Mathematics curriculum.

“The school itself is a perfect scenario for a child that is really behind and can use every single day to catch up both academically and deal with the issues that have been holding him back, which are all those cognitive areas,” Redler said.

Maritza Perera, school counselor, Joshua, Nilsa and Dr. Fabian Redler, director and founder of LIFT Educational Academy in Miami Lakes, Florida.

Roberts found What’s On Your Mind two years ago while researching education options for Joshua. She brought him in for an evaluation, signed him up for the summer program then enrolled him in LIFT.

“But what was unique with Joshua was the seizures. We didn’t know what to expect in terms of whether the brain training would stick, because of all his seizures,” Redler said. “We had to work as much as we could to just develop his ability. Whatever stays, stays. Whatever doesn’t, doesn’t. At the end of the day, it’s given him the best interventions that he can have. So far, it’s been awesome.”

‘Kind of like a miracle’

Joshua has had three brain surgeries, the first when he was 3. He still has tumors in his brain, including one in his right eye.

While Joshua can have as many as three seizures a day, he senses when one is coming on and he can usually go to a quiet place.

His body stiffens and his breathing increases. He feels a pounding inside his head. His eyes open wide and his right hand goes straight up. He can hear people talk, and it helps if someone is telling him he will be OK. The seizures last between 90 seconds and 3 minutes and occur mostly in the morning or when he’s going to bed.

“He’s embarrassed by it, but he does a good job of hiding it,” Roberts said.

Except when he can’t, which happened often at his prior schools. Some classmates made fun of him, which made him angry. The fact that he was behind his classmates in learning – reading at a grade level or two below them – also made him angry. He felt like an outsider and started acting up, so it became a behavioral thing,” Roberts said.

In the fourth grade, Joshua was placed in a class for students with behavioral issues. Roberts said it was a lost year in terms of academic growth.

“He learned literally nothing that year,” Roberts said, “because in the first week of school, they gave up on my child.”

She said finding Redler and his program has been “kind of like a miracle.”

“Before it was, ‘He’s on medicine so he can’t focus. He’s had seizures and he can’t focus,’” Roberts said. “He’s able to do it now, and I think those exercises have helped a lot. I think it’s meant for his way of learning.”

“Joshua is going to do amazing’

Maritza Perera, the school counselor at LIFT, interrupted Joshua while he was writing in his journal. His presence was requested in Redler’s office, so he could talk about his school for this story.

Joshua was not happy. He was only two sentences into his journal assignment.

He was shy, unusually so, according to his mom.

Do you like going to school here, he was asked.

Joshua in his Little League uniform.

He nodded.

Why?

“It’s fun.”

What makes it fun?

“I’m learning.”

Do you want to share what you were writing in your journal?

Joshua shook his head no.

Do you like brain training?

A nod.

What exercise do you like best?

“Mental Treasure Box.”

Redler found the answer interesting.

“Mental Treasure Box is for when thoughts come in that have nothing to do with what your focused on,” Redler explained. “You’re trained to take those thoughts and put them in your mental treasure box and go back to them later.”

After a few questions about baseball – Joshua likes the Miami Marlins and bats right-handed even though he’s a natural lefty – he returned to his classroom and his journal.

Roberts watched her son on the wall monitor. School has been a struggle for Joshua, but she’s confident he is finally in the right setting.

Now that he is no longer a lost student, Roberts sees a brighter picture when she thinks about Joshua’s future.

“I’m very positive about Joshua. Joshua is going to do amazing,” she said. “I see him continuing to grow in education. I can see Joshua going to college. I can see him having a job, a very good job somewhere and being independent. I can see him doing that.”

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.