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Universal Property & Casualty Insurance donates $5 million to Step Up

By ASHLEY ZARLE

March 10, 2021 | FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.– Step Up For Students announced March 10 a $5 million contribution to the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program from Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company (UPCIC), helping 708 lower-income Florida schoolchildren attend the K-12 school that best fits their learning needs.

Since 2017, UPCIC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Universal Insurance Holdings, Inc. has generously funded 1,968 scholarships through contributions totaling $13.5 million to Step Up For Students, a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

UPCIC announced a $5 million contribution to Step Up For Students. Pictured (from left to right) are
American Platinum Vice President of Marketing David Ahern, UPCIC Vice President of Marketing Stacey Tomko, UPCIC Spokesperson and NFL Hall of Famer Dan Marino, and Step Up For Students Development Officer David Bryant.

“Universal is committed to giving back to the communities we serve,” said Steve Donaghy, Chief Executive Officer for Universal Insurance Holdings, Inc. (UIH). “We are proud to support hundreds of Florida schoolchildren through our partnership with Step Up For Students.”

UPCIC celebrated this donation with a check presentation at their corporate office in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Dan Marino, UPCIC spokesperson, National Football League hall of famer and former Miami Dolphins quarterback joined the celebration in support of UPCIC’s commitment to Florida schoolchildren.

“Because of the support of companies like UPCIC, deserving students throughout Florida can access the school that best fits their learning needs,” said Doug Tuthill, Step Up For Students president. “UPCIC’s commitment to their community is incredible and because of their continued partnership we are able to provide educational options for lower-income families in Florida.”

During the 2020-21 school year, nearly 100,000 K-12 students throughout Florida are benefiting from a Florida Tax Credit Scholarship through Step Up for Students. About 57% of scholarship children are from single-parent households and nearly 68% are Black or Hispanic. The average household income of families accepted to receive scholarships is $25,755 – a mere 9% above poverty. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the program.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Cal-Maine Foods donates $100,000 to help lower-income Florida students

By Ashley Zarle

DADE CITY, Fla.– Cal-Maine Foods, Inc., the largest producer and marketer of eggs in the United States, has contributed $100,000 to Step Up For Students, helping more than 14 Florida lower-income schoolchildren attend a K-12 school that best fits their learning needs.

This is the second year that Cal-Maine Foods has partnered with Step Up for Students and has generously funded nearly 30 Florida Tax Credit scholarships through contributions totaling $200,000.

Chris Myers, Cal-Maine Foods VP of Operations for NC,SC,GA,FL, and Ela Wysokinska, Cal-Maine Foods Regional Accounting Manager, present a $100,000 donation in support of the Step Up For Students Scholarship Program to Step Up For Students Development Officer Diana Allen.

“At Cal-Maine Foods, it is a priority for us to give back to our community,” said Dolph Baker, CEO of Cal-Maine Foods. “We are proud to invest in the future of Florida schoolchildren and we know our partnership with Step Up For Students is doing just that.”

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. This income-based scholarship program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and gives lower-income students  in Florida the opportunity to attend a private or assists with transportation costs to an out-of-district school that best meets the scholar’s learning needs.

“We are excited to have Cal-Maine Foods as a partner again this year,” said Doug Tuthill, president of Step Up For Students. “It is because of donors like Cal-Maine foods that we are able to fulfil our mission of helping disadvantaged schoolchildren access a school that fits their learning needs.”

During the 2020-21 school year, nearly 100,000 K-12 Florida students are benefiting from a Florida Tax Credit scholarship administered by Step Up for Students. About 57% of these scholars are from single-parent households and nearly 68% are Black or Hispanic. The average household income of families accepted to receive scholarships is $25,755 – a mere 9% above poverty. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at AZarle@StepUpForStudents.org.

Assurant donates $8 million to support Step Up’s income-based scholarship program

Step Up For Students announced that Assurant, a leading global provider of lifestyle and housing solutions that support, protect and connect major consumer purchases, has donated $8 million through the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program to Step Up, helping Florida schoolchildren attend the K-12 school that best fits their learning needs.

This is the first year that Assurant has partnered with Step Up and the donation will fund more than 1,132 K-12 scholarships for lower-income children in Florida.

“At Assurant, our core values of common sense, common decency, uncommon thinking, and uncommon results inspire our commitment to be a responsible corporate citizen,” said Alan Colberg, Assurant President and CEO. “We are proud to partner with Step Up For Students and help lower-income Florida families access the education options they deserve.”

Step Up is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

Assurant announced an $8 million contribution to Step Up For Students for the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. Pictured are students at St. Joseph Catholic School in Tampa, Florida who are among those benefiting from the scholarship.

“We all know a great education is key to helping our kids find success and dream for the future,” said Florida House Speaker Chris Sprowls. “That is why programs like the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program are crucial for our state, and I applaud Assurant for their investment in educational choice options for our state’s underprivileged schoolchildren.”

During the 2020-21 schoolyear, nearly 100,000 K-12 students throughout Florida are benefiting from a Florida Tax Credit Scholarship managed by Step Up For Students. 

“I am happy to see Assurant participate in assuring all students can get a great education regardless of zip code,” said Senator Manny Diaz. “I am proud to see this Miami-Dade employer become a partner in this program for the future of the community.”

About 57% of scholarship children are from single-parent households and nearly 68% are black or Hispanic. The average household income of families accepted to receive scholarships is $25,755 – a mere 9% above poverty. More than 1,800 schools currently participate in the program.

“We are honored to have Assurant as a partner in our mission to help deserving Florida families access schools that best fit their children’s unique learning needs,” said Doug Tuthill, Step Up For Students president. “Through their support of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program, which is producing measurable results, companies like Assurant are transforming the lives of schoolchildren in our community.”

Love of learning returns for this student with Down syndrome

By LISA A. DAVIS

On most Friday mornings 14-year-old Matthew Mezzei springs awake in the 5 o’clock hour, excited to start his school day. It’s the earliest he rises. His inner alarm clock alerts him to a special day in his family’s home in rural Pasco County:

“Fun Friday!” his mother, Lisa Mezzei, said. “It’s a reward at the end of a busy week.”

On this particular Friday, it’s 10 a.m., and Matthew, a bespectacled boy with a bright smile and a love for baseball, excitedly greets a visitor to his home in Zephyrhills. His house is also his classroom. The day’s schedule is laid out on the kitchen counter. It includes several educational centers such as science, math, reading and even an obstacle course for agility exercises. They use much of their home’s shared living space as a classroom, and Fun Friday consists of educational game centers rather than straight curriculum.

“Centers help me to remember,” Matthew said.

Matthew was born with Down syndrome. His education began at his neighborhood school where he had an Individualized Education Program, known as an IEP, which is essentially a guide for children with certain special needs to reach their educational goals more easily. Matthew was in a general classroom and had great support, but by first grade something changed.

“When he was 7, he started not understanding what was being asked of him on tests,” his mother recalled. “He kept saying he felt tricked, and he started withdrawing at school.”

That’s when Mezzei knew she had to do something, because her happy-go-lucky boy was now often sad. She began researching her options and realized private and charter schools were not a good fit for Matthew either. Then she discovered the Gardiner Scholarship for children with certain special needs managed by Step Up For Students. The scholarship program was new at that time. Home school seemed like the best option, and at an average of $10,000 per student annually to pay for curriculum and other approved learning tools, she added full-time teacher to her role. She decided it was best for her son to repeat first grade.

“Because of the Gardiner Scholarship, it wasn’t as daunting (to try home schooling),” she said. “The timing was so fortuitous. We had been wanting to withdraw him from the school, but we had no other options. At least the financial part wasn’t so scary.”

She used the scholarship to purchase learning aids for Matthew from places like Lakeshore Learning and Rainbow Resource. She bought science experiment kits, agility equipment, math games, chapter books, Handwriting Without Tears curriculum and more. They have used the funds for speech and occupational therapy.

Home schooling made all the difference, Mezzei said.

“Within six months, not only was his personality back, his confidence was back, and his love of learning was back,” she said.

Matthew loves learning about geography and the world around him. He has been making great strides since becoming a Gardiner scholar through Step Up For Students.

He made great strides, and his reading comprehension increased substantially.

His occupational and speech therapists agree that Matthew, now a seventh grader has made great progress since being home-schooled.

“The Mezzei family is a therapist’s dream family,” said Kelly Partain, Matthew’s occupational therapist. “They truly take all recommendations to heart and actually implement them, which makes for excellent outcomes. Matthew continues to exceed his goals as he has an excellent attitude and works hard every day at home while being home-schooled, at therapy, or on the ball field.”

Added his speech therapist, Lindsey Leeson, who works at the same clinic as Partain, “He has a big heart and is always looking to help other kids in our clinic and tells us how much he loves and appreciates us every session. “He’s a gem.”

Like most things, his therapy sessions moved online in March, but he continues to make strides.

Matthew’s speech is often hard to understand for those who first meet him, but his glowing personality and love of learning come shining through.

“This scholarship is life-changing and allows us to educate Matthew to the fullest extent of his abilities,” Mezzei said. “Our biggest hope is for him to be happy and successful in life, and as you know, we believe unequivocally this is his best path. … Matthew is so proud of what he learns and knows.”

Lisa A. Davis can be reached at ldavis@sufs.org.

Step Up earns another 4-star rating from Charity Navigator

Step Up For Students has again received a coveted four-star rating from Charity Navigator, the nation’s top charity evaluator.

The rating is based on Step Up’s demonstration of strong financial health and its commitment to accountability and transparency.

“We are incredibly passionate about what we do and how we do it. We work incredibly hard to change the lives of Florida’s most vulnerable children, but that mission is nothing without the trust of our donors,” said Step Up President Doug Tuthill. “That’s why earning this rating is not only important to us, it’s critical.”

This is the 14th time Step Up has received a four-star rating from Charity Navigator in as many years.

In a letter to Step Up, Charity Navigator President Michael Thatcher wrote, “This is our highest possible rating and indicates your organization adheres to sector best practices and executes its mission in a financially efficient way. Attaining a 4-star rating verifies that Step Up For Students exceeds industry standards and outperforms most charities in your work area. … This exceptional designation from Charity Navigator sets Step Up for Students apart from its peers and demonstrates to the public its trustworthiness.”

Charity Navigator evaluates more than 1.5 million American charities.

“The intent of our work is to provide donors with essential information to give them greater confidence in both the charitable decisions that they make and the nonprofit sector,” Thatcher wrote.

Charity Navigator’s rating is the latest accolade given to Step Up by national organizations.

Step Up ranked 18th in the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s most recent list of Top 100 nonprofits and 19th on Forbes’ list of America’s Top Charities. In addition, Step Up has earned GuideStar’s Platinum Seal of Transparency.

A Virtual Pomp and Circumstance: Step Up celebrates Class of 2020

By LISA A. DAVIS

Hundreds of parents, guardians, students, and teachers joined Step Up For Students online May 21 to recognize the resilient senior Class of 2020 in a time when COVID-19 has added the new term social distancing to everyday vocabulary and canceled in-person milestone events.

The recorded virtual senior celebration can be viewed online here.

In their final two months of their high school careers, students nationwide had to finish their education virtually as stay-at-home orders shuttered school buildings, on March 16 in Florida. High school seniors perhaps felt the impact most, with senior events like prom and graduation being canceled or moved to drive-by parades and virtual celebrations. Soon after typical everyday life came to a halt, Step Up staff began planning the special online event for scholarship seniors.

“High school graduation is a time to celebrate the achievement of Florida’s young men and women and the current pandemic won’t stop us from recognizing the achievements of these special students,” said Doug Tuthill, president of Step Up.

Step Up For Students, a Florida-based nonprofit scholarship funding organization, manages the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship and Family Empower Scholarship for lower-income families, the Gardiner Scholarship for children with certain special needs, the Hope Scholarship for children who are bullied in public schools and the Reading Scholarship Accounts. For the 2019-20 school year, Step Up served more than 130,000 students, including 4,445 seniors.

Florida Tax Credit scholar Gabriella Bueno
of Boca Christian School.

Tuthill, Step Up Founder and Chairman John Kirtley, and corporate donor representatives addressed the Class of 2020 during the event. The Rev. Robert Ward of Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church in St. Petersburg gave the invocation.

 State lawmakers congratulated the class of 2020 as well.

“Even though you’ve gone through strange times and faced many obstacles,” Sen. Manny Diaz, who serves as the Senate Committee on Education chair, said to the graduating seniors, “We are here today to give you a graduation message, and that is congratulations for your hard work.”

Added Rep. Susan Valdes, “Best of luck to you and go get them, Class of 2020. I know that our future is much brighter because of you.”

Paul Shoukry, a Step Up advisory board member and CFO for Raymond James Financial, a founding donor of Step Up’s Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program, was one of several donor representatives who spoke during the 30-minute event.

“Continue investing in yourself, as this is an important step in a long and successful journey. Congratulations,” he said.

Step Up selected two scholarship students to address their peers.

Florida Tax Credit scholar Gabriella Bueno, of Boca Christian School, credited her scholarship with helping her get the education she needed to set her on a path to become a pharmacist.

Gardiner scholar Ryan Sleboda of Pace Brantley School in Longwood.

“I have much to be grateful for and I would personally like to thank Step Up, the lawmakers who believe in education choice and the donor who support it. You have all allowed me to attend what I believe has been the best school for me and has helped shaped me into the person I am today.”

Gardiner scholar Ryan Sleboda, also shared his journey with autism, not being able to speak until the age of 7, and with the help of a scholarship graduating as the class valedictorian in unprecedented times.

“Who would have imagined this is the way our senior year would end,” said, Ryan Sleboda, a Gardiner Scholarship student and valedictorian from the Pace Brantley School in Longwood, Fla. “Class of 2020, let’s go forth and resume this incredible journey!”

Kirtley, Step Up’s founder, closed out the event, saying success should not be measured by the norm.

“Be conscious of what scoreboard you are using to measure yourself. I know mine has changed. Pursue those things that can be measured for sure — those grades, that college admission, that job, that raise, that promotion. But don’t forget to measure yourself by things that have no numbers or figures,” he said and continued telling a story about a cab that drove by him in New York City advertising the Broadway musical Rent, with the words “Measure your life in love.”

“Well that sign stopped me in my tracks,” he said. “And I realized right then that I needed to worry less about measuring my life in numbers, in figures, and maybe take the advice on that sign. And it took me a few more years to understand that it’s much more important to measure the love that you give, rather than the love that you receive.

“One of the ways that I measure the love that I give is what I do everyday to empower parents to choose the best education for their kids, and knowing that you are today are graduating is all the love I need in return and knowing that you will put that education to work in these interesting times.”

Lisa A. Davis can be reached at ldavis@sufs.org.

The world is watching and sweating along with the students in Father Lopez virtual gym class

By ROGER MOONEY

It’s 9 a.m. on a Tuesday, Larissa Maloney, standing on a mat in the corner of her garage, presses the record button on her phone and what might be the largest physical education class in the world is under way.

Beginning with a simple warmup exercise – butt kicks – Maloney leads her virtual students that sometimes number in the thousands through a 30-minute workout. Depending on the day, the class includes burpees, heel touches, kick boxing, basketball jump shots, volleyball overhand smashes and digs, and yes, even swimming.

Maloney is physical education teacher at Father Lopez Catholic High School in Daytona Beach, Florida. Many of the students attend the private school on a Florida Tax Credit Scholarship managed by Step Up For Students. She began the virtual class in late March after schools in Florida were closed because of COVID-19.

Maloney named the class Active Kids 2.0 and started a YouTube channel so her students could participate.

Yet, four weeks later, Active Kids 2.0 has nearly 1,500 subscribers on YouTube. Some days, a session receives as many as 6,000 clicks.

“It’s just blown up,” Maloney said. “I just thought originally it was going to be for my students, then I had a friend ask if her students could do it too. I said, ‘Of course. Why not?’”

The success of the virtual gym class does not surprise Father Lopez Principal Leigh Svajko. Maloney changes the workouts daily to keep them fresh and goes through the workouts herself, keeping the class as close to real for her students as can be excepted during the pandemic.

“I think her willingness to get out there to be live every day, especially with our students that she interacts with, just shows her level of investment to them,” Svajko said. “It’s how plugged in she is to it.”

Like every teacher in the state, Maloney needed a way to continue teaching her 75 students. But how do you teach PE without the use of a gym or athletic fields?

“This whole distance learning thing, there was no preparation for teachers,” Maloney said. “I know a lot of teachers didn’t have a lesson plan in their back pocket, especially for physical education.”

She began by writing daily lesson plans – run a mile on Monday, push-ups and sit-ups on Tuesday, arms and abdominal exercises on Wednesday and so on. Her plan was to send them to her students each day and have them reply with what they did and how long it took to complete.

“After I wrote that, I said, ‘How boring.’ I’m boring myself just sitting here reading it,” Maloney said. “I have 14- through 18-year-olds. That’s not going to cut it. I said, ‘You know what? They’re used to seeing me every day, so let’s press record and do it like they’re used to seeing me do it in class.’ Have them see me, see me doing it, see me enjoying it and have them follow along and they can enjoy it, not only by themselves but with their families, as well.”

Father Lopez students are used to seeing Maloney in action. She was a three-sport athlete in high school who earned a volleyball scholarship to Lynn University in Boca Raton, Florida. After that, she spent five years on the professional beach volleyball circuit. She now coaches the girls’ varsity volleyball team at Father Lopez.

Maloney participates in her PE classes along with her students, whether it’s learning a new sport or completing the stations of circuit training – jumping rope, abdominal station, core station and free weights.

“I knew I wanted to do something to bring that excitement, that intensity and fire within my videos, so they still know I’m still with them,” she said. “I think it’s important for the students to know that I’m doing it with them, I’m working with them and I’m cheering them on. They know that I’m their biggest fan. So, these videos are probably no surprise to my kids.”

Judging by the feedback left on Maloney’s Facebook page by her students, Active Kids 2.0 is as successful as a class held in Father Lopez’s gym.

  • “I’m so surprised by how good the online workouts are!”
  • “The online workouts are great especially since I’m stuck at home all day. It’s a motivational way to get me going in the morning!”
  • “Seeing my coach like I normally would on a school day feels like she’s there with me!”
  • “I try to push as hard as I can because she knows we can complete these workouts and that’s the incentive for me to do my best.”
  • “I love doing these workouts! I really miss seeing everyone, but these are the next best thing.”

What is a surprise to Maloney is how popular her videos have become. She draws viewers from across the United States, Canada, England, Australia and Africa.

Father Lopez Assistant Principal Marie Gallo-Lethcoe said the Coach Maloney those who tune in around the world see every morning is the same Coach Maloney those at the school see every day.

“They’re getting the real deal,” she said.

Before beginning, Maloney posted her idea for the videos, which run Monday through Friday, on several forums for PE teachers.

The reaction?

“This is amazing! Can I use it.”

“This is awesome. I would love to use it.”

Maloney replied to each, “Absolutely! Use it.”

The first video was recorded on the final Monday in March. It drew 100 clicks. The video recorded the following day drew 500 clicks. That quickly jumped to 1,000 the next day and climbed to 6,000 by the end of the week.

“I was like, ‘Oh my goodness, there’s something here,’” Maloney said.

The increase can be attributed to the stay at home orders in most states during this pandemic. Maloney knows a lot of her students are joined by brothers and sisters and parents. She has heard from viewers across North America who complete the sessions during family time, something that can take place at any time of the day since they are recorded.

“Four weeks ago, thinking I would bring families closer together was not even on my radar,” she said.

Maloney said before it was announced that schools in Florida will not reopen this school year that she does not plan on ending Active Kids 2.0.

“I’ve gotten so much – and it’s weird to say this – but fan mail, and I’ve gotten so many families on board and so much love from the videos that people have committed to doing them every day, so I will keep doing them until I don’t have any viewers,” Maloney said. “I’ll do them as long as I can.”

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Want to be a Step Up SuperFan? It’s easy and no capes required

By JUDITH THOMAS

Want to be a Step Up For Students hero, but can’t find your cape?

Here’s the next best thing and it’s at your fingertips: Become a Step Up SuperFan.

No capes required.

How? It’s easy: by staying connected with Step Up and becoming a social ambassador. You’re invited to join the Step Up For Students SuperFans program.

We will begin sending you our most exciting news through email to share with your friends and followers. You choose where you share our content and any commentary you wish to make. You can share it through email, on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or all of the above. Sharing our posts helps spread the word about our programs to those who need it most so they can get the educational help they need.

Helping us spread the word so it gets to those who might not know about our five scholarship programs makes you not just a superfan, but a hero in our eyes. And it’s just plain fun.

The best part? The more you share and participate, the more points you’ll earn towards a monthly giveaway. This month we’re giving away a $20 Amazon gift card and one of Step Up’s new promotional items of your choosing (from a selection).

To join now, click on the link below, connect with one of your social networks and start earning points to win. We are extremely grateful to those who help us get the message out.

JOIN STEP UP FOR STUDENTS SUPERFANS

Young readers learn value of collaboration as friends help a skunk find his stink

By ROGER MOONEY

It’s a sad day for a skunk who loses his stink, especially when the skunk is the sheriff, and his stink is his way of keeping the locals in line.

Ah, but that is the plight of Señor Olor.

The coauthors hope this is the first in a series of books that teach social emotional learning lessons to children pre-K to second grade.

When Bandido the raccoon is seen robbing the grocery store, the sheriff arrives to save the day.

“Put your paws up, or I’ll spray,” shouts the sheriff.

Bring it on, says Bandido.

The sheriff spins, raises his tail and …

¡Nada!

“What’s wrong, Señor? Cat got your stink?” shouts Bandido, as he makes off with his ill-gotten booty.

So begins the tale of Señor Olor, the hero of “The Skunk Who Lost His Stink.”

Published in late-December of 2018, the children’s book aimed at readers pre-K-to-second grade, was coauthored by Jessica Sergiacomi and Jacquelyn Covert, both 32.

Sergiacomi taught first grade at Miami Shores Presbyterian Church School, a K-5 school that accepts Step Up For Students scholarships. (Beginning in August, Sergiacomi will teach third grade at Miami Country Day School in Miami Shores.) She received the Exceptional Teacher Award in February at the Rising Stars Event, hosted by Step Up.

“She’s so creative,” said Emily Ashworth, whose son Wesley is on the high-functioning end of the autism spectrum and attends Miami Shores Presbyterian on a Gardiner Scholarship, administered by Step Up.

So is Covert, who attended The Benjamin School in Palm Beach and is now a Realtor living with her family in Charleston, S.C.

The two became friends in 2005 during move-in day of their freshman year at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut.

They began writing books together during their junior year and have written close to 15. All are children’s books with a strong message.

“The Skunk Who Lost His Stink” is the first to be self-published.

The idea, Sergiacomi said, came from her dad.

“It was a few years ago, and my dad said, ‘Baby skunks don’t spray.’ I thought, ‘Oh, that would be a cool title, ‘The Skunk Who Lost His Stink,’ and it went from there,” Sergiacomi said.

It took them an hour to write the first draft.

“We cracked up the whole time,” Covert said.

That’s because they mix humor with a storyline of collaboration.

“Having friends who help. Having friends by your side,” Sergiacomi said.

Ivanna the Iguana, Aramis Dillo the armadillo, and Quill the porcupine join Señor Olor as he journeys to meet the wise grey wolf.

They believe wise grey wolf will help the sheriff find his stink.

Spoiler alert: She does.

She suddenly howls and scares the, um, stink out of the sheriff.

The coauthors: Jackie Covert and Jessica Sergiacomi

That part causes quite the stir when Sergiacomi and Covert read their book to children at schools and libraries.

“We do get a lot of giggles,” Covert said.

The children howl along with the wise grey wolf, and Sergiacomi, dressed in a skunk costume she bought on Amazon, pretends to find her stink.

“This is why (Sergiacomi is) so great,” Ashworth said. “She really gets into the minds of these kids and figures them out. It’s the perfect lower-elementary school level humor, and they think it’s hilarious.”

But there is more to “The Skunk Who Lost His Stink” than some potty humor.

Sergiacomi wants to learn Spanish, so she and Covert sprinkled Spanish words throughout the book.

Señor Olor translates to Mr. Stink.

The Bandido (bandit) robs La Basura (the trash), which is the local grocery store. The characters live in El Pueblo de Animales (The Village of the Animals).

To give their young female readers a strong female character, the coauthors made the wise grey wolf a female.

There is also a social emotional learning (SEL) theme to the book. The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning defines social emotional learning as the process where students learn how to manage and understand emotions, act responsibly, maintain positive relationships, achieve goals and display empathy.

Patricia Handly, the former curriculum director at Miami Shores Presbyterian, taught Sergiacomi how to teach social emotional learning.

“It’s really the key,” Sergiacomi said. “It’s a big part of my motivation for teaching. I feel very passionate about SEL, and I incorporate it in my daily lessons. I am the teacher I am today because of (Handly).”

Sergiacomi dresses like the hero of her book when visiting schools and libraries for readings.

While it took Sergiacomi and Covert an hour to write the story, it took them nearly four years to get it published. The biggest piece was finding an illustrator. They used Richard Kenyon, Sergiacomi’s friend from elementary school.

The two authors are already working on a sequel with an anti-violence theme.

“We’ll find out the raccoon is not so bad at all,” Sergiacomi said. “He’s stealing food to feed his cousins. Everyone has a little good in them. He’s trying to help his friends.”

There is talk of a prequel, a story of how Señor Olor became sheriff. If you pay close attention to the illustrations on the first page of the text, you’ll notice photos hanging on the wall of Señor Olor’s home of the sheriffs in his family. One is a female.

Señora Olor?

“These are just ideas floating around,” Sergiacomi said.

The coauthors want to continue this series before moving on to some of their other unpublished works.

“It’s a start,” Sergiacomi said. “The goal is to have a whole bunch of these books with social emotional learning themes.”

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Step Up’s Jacksonville office ranked among best places to work in that city

BY ROGER MOONEY

The honors continue to roll in for Step Up For Students.

The nonprofit’s Jacksonville office was ranked among the top places to work in that city by the Jacksonville Business Journal, placing third in the category for Large Companies (100-249 employees).

“It is such an honor that our employees are being recognized for the work they do each day to create an organizational culture that enables us to fulfill our mission to the best of our abilities,” said Anne White, Step Up’s chief administrative officer.

Representing Step Up’s Jacksonville office at the event were
(top row from left) Jessica Detmer, Diana Beane, Anne White, Renae Sweeney, Kym Beelman (bottom row from left) Judith Thomas, Andrea Thoermer and Kaitlyn Laudenslager

The Jacksonville Business Journal partnered with Quantum Workplace, an employee engagement research firm, to compile the rankings. Quantum Research surveys employees and analyzes the results to determine employee satisfaction.

Employees are evaluated in the areas of team effectiveness, retention risk, alignment with goals, trust with co-workers, individual contribution, manager effectiveness, trust in senior leaders, feeling valued, work engagement and people practices.

The results were announced May 23 at an event held at the Baseball Grounds at Jacksonville.

Step Up’s Clearwater office was recently ranked eighth among large companies in the Tampa Bay area by the Tampa Bay Business Journal.

Nationally, Step Up was ranked 19th on Forbes’ list of America’s Top Charities 2018. It was also recognized in 2018 for its financial accountability and transparency from two nonprofit watchdog groups: Charity Navigator and GuideStar. Charity Navigator awarded Step Up a four-star rating for the seventh consecutive year, a credit that only 4 percent of charities have earned by the nation’s top charity evaluator. Step Up has earned the Platinum Seal of Transparency with GuideStar, a public database that evaluates the mission and effectiveness of nonprofits.

Step Up helps more than 115,000 pre-K-12 children annually in Florida gain access to education options by helping manage five scholarship programs: The Florida Tax Credit Scholarship and recently created Family Empowerment Scholarship for lower-income families; the Gardiner Scholarship for children with special needs or unique abilities; the Hope Scholarship for students who have been bullied at a public school; and the Reading Scholarship Accounts for children in grades 3-5 who struggle with reading.

RogerMooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

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