All Posts by Lisa Davis

Meet Ben Zanca, Gardiner scholar

By GEOFF FOX

Student-Spotlight_blog REseizedDoctors didn’t expect Ben Zanca to live very long. Even before his birth, fluid was drained from his lungs every week for eight weeks until he was delivered.

Ben’s parents, Ann and Tony Zanca, were told Ben may need a chest tube after his birth and possibly surgery.

“But, when they put the (chest) tube in all the blood vessels shut down,” Ann Zanca said. “It’s called persistent pulmonary hypertension, which not many people survive at that age. He was transferred to Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children (in Orlando) where there is a heart-lung bypass machine.” Ben Z

Things looked bleak.

“They told us he was going to die,” Tony Zanca said. “They called in a priest and everything.”

Fortunately, a nitric oxide treatment worked and Ben did not have to go on the lung-heart bypass machine.

“They said they’d never seen a baby as sick as Ben pull through,” Ann Zanca said.

Unfortunately, Ben’s medical struggles and the family’s worries were only beginning. Problems with his blood vessels went misdiagnosed for more than 12 years.

About 18 months ago, Ben, now an outgoing 14-year-old who loves camping, was finally diagnosed with CLOVES syndrome, an extremely rare disorder characterized by tissue overgrowth and complex vascular malformations. Worldwide, less than 200 cases of CLOVES syndrome have ever been identified, according to information from Boston Children’s Hospital.

Because of CLOVES, Ben is at risk for developing blood clots and has regular doctor visits to monitor his vascular health.

That’s not his only issue. Shortly after he was born, Ben was diagnosed with cerebral palsy. He also has been diagnosed on the autism spectrum and deals with epilepsy and asthma.

Until the current school year, he attended public school in Altamonte Springs, Florida, where he lives with his family, including 9-year-old sister Megan. Tony Zanca works in the parts department of a local auto dealer and Ann works part-time jobs as a computer programmer analyst and as an advocate for parents with children who have an Individualized Educational Plan.

Ben was not thriving at the public school.

“It’s not that they didn’t care, but he wasn’t going anywhere; he was going backward,” Tony Zanca said. “Teachers have their hands tied with all the new testing and all they did was quizzing for the test. There was no hands-on learning, which is what Ben thrives on.”

For years, Ann Zanca wanted to enroll Ben in the nearby Pace Brantley School in Longwood, but the family couldn’t afford it. Established in 1971, the school has always been geared toward students with learning issues. It is situated on nine wooded acres that offer a serene setting.

Eventually, a friend told Ann Zanca about the Gardiner Scholarship for children with certain special needs; the scholarship is managed by Step Up For Students. In 2016, the Zancas applied for the scholarship – which can help families pay for tuition at partner schools,  approved therapists, specialists, curriculum, technology or even a college savings account – and Ben was accepted.

“Ben is very social and I don’t want him to miss out on the experience of school,” Ann Zanca said. “They have a well-rounded curriculum and lots of extra-curricular activities. They even have a prom. I was also concerned if it would be academic enough. Of all the places I knew of or visited, it seemed to be up to standards.

“It seems to challenge him but he doesn’t seem overwhelmed. There are people there to help him. We do have a private tutor for math. His teacher tells me he’s definitely challenged in pre-algebra, but he’s doing well. That makes me happy. The goal is that he’ll be able to get a regular diploma and either go to vocational school or college afterward.”

Now in eighth grade, Ben enjoys going to school. Due to his medical issues, he often has doctor’s appointments during the school day. Before, his mother said, he would sometimes call from school to see if she could pick him up early. Now, he doesn’t want to leave Pace Brantley’s campus.

While he has historically struggled with reading, English is now one of his favorite subjects, along with math.

“We were learning substitution, the three ways of substitution in math,” Ben said after a recent day at school. “That’s in algebra; it’s coming along.”

Of his favorite times of day is FLEX (Focused Learning Experience) Time, when students can choose a subject of their own to explore after lunch. Activities can include arts and crafts, learning a foreign language, tennis, yoga, tai chi or taking virtual field trips on a Smartphone.

On this particular day, Ben chose art.

“We were drawing different types of flags and what they look like,” he said. “I drew the Florida flag.”

Jennifer Portilla, Ben’s reading and language arts teacher, said she has seen him flourish since the school year began.

“He seems really comfortable and he’s willing to take risks. He’s not afraid to not be successful” in class, she said. “Academically, he’s making strides. He’s a pretty good writer for his age. He is able to write an essay and he doesn’t seem to struggle as much as at the beginning of the year.”

One of Ben’s other interests is the Boy Scouts. Despite his son’s many medical obstacles, Tony Zanca said he tries to treat him “like any other boy would be treated.” On a recent Boy Scout camping trip, he allowed Ben to paddle on a canoe with another scout.

“Years ago, I would never let him out in canoes down the river without me,” Tony Zanca said. “But it’s like I told him, ‘I’m going to have to start letting you do things by yourself, make your decisions and not do things wrong’. Someday soon, I’ll let him go on a (Boy Scout) camping trip by himself.”

The Zancas say that while Ben is obviously aware that he has medical issues, he doesn’t dwell on them. Because CLOVES can cause blood clots (Ben has had a few), they constantly monitor how he’s feeling. Now that he’s at Pace Brantley, which has a nurse on campus, his parents are more at ease.

“The scholarship was huge, like the answer to our prayers,” Ann Zanca said. “His self-confidence has increased tremendously. It’s a lot of hands-on learning. He made a car out of a Coke bottle and started telling me about Newton’s Laws of Motion. His self-confidence has increased tremendously.”

Reach Geoff Fox at Gfox@sufs.org

Students, parents and educators recognized during Step Up’s Rising Stars Awards

By LISA A. DAVIS

Isis Severe, 8, a third grader from Masters Preparatory School, is presented with a scholarship during Step Up For Students' Rising Star Awards at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017.

Isis Severe, 8, a third grader from Masters Preparatory School, is presented with a medal during Step Up For Students’ Rising Star Awards at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017.

For two weeks in February Step Up For Students shined the spotlight on scholars, parents and educators who this school year have gone above and beyond while participating in at least one of two scholarship programs for schoolchildren in Florida.

The Rising Stars Awards ceremony was held at nine different locations across the state, recognizing those outstanding individuals involved with either Step Up’s Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program for lower-income students, or the state-funded Gardiner Program for children with certain special needs. This year, Step Up received more than 650 nominations for the Rising Stars Awards.

Teachers, students, and scholars’ family members were nominated by teachers and school administrators for exceptional work throughout the school year at their respective Step Up partner schools.

Step Up For Students present students with scholarships during their Rising Star Awards at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017.

Step Up For Students present students with medals during their Rising Star Awards at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017.

This year, 98,000 K-12 students are using the tax-credit scholarship statewide for tuition assistance at the private school of their choice, or on a transportation scholarship to offset the cost to an out-of-district public school. Another nearly 8,000 more scholars, ages 3 to 22, use the Gardiner Scholarship to customize their education by attending participating schools or by using approved, therapists, specialists, curriculum, technology – even a college savings account.

Ken Jerry Synvrit, from Schoolhouse Preparatory, is presented with a scholarship during Step Up For Students' Rising Star Awards at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017.

Ken Jerry Synvrit, from Schoolhouse Preparatory, is presented with a medal during Step Up For Students’ Rising Star Awards at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017.

“We are so proud of our scholars and those who help them realize their dreams and academic success,” Step Up President Doug Tuthill said before the event.  “It’s important to recognize all of those who make this program a success, and that includes the teachers who educate these kids, the parents who wanted more for their children, the kids who work hard toward their futures, and of course, our generous donors, which without them we would not exist.”

Corporate donors who help fund the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship program attended each of the Rising Star Awards events and were also recognized for their support, and had a chance to meet the families they help through their donations. In 2016, the corporate community contributed a total $559 million for these scholarships.

 

 

Step Up expands Teaching and Learning Exchange tool for teachers, parents and students

By LISA A. DAVIS

There’s something amazing going on in Step Up For Students partner schools and hundreds of teachers, their students and their students’ parents and guardians are benefiting from it: The Teaching and Learning Exchange.

The Teaching and Learning Exchange (TLE) is a free web-based application designed to support teaching, learning, communication and accountability for administrators, teachers, parents and guardians and students. It was created by Step Up For Students Office of Student Learning and IT team members.TLEcapture

“This tool is opening the lines of communications between all key factors in a child’s education: students, teachers and parents,” said Carol Thomas, vice president of Office of Student Learning. “And our latest update of the applications has really made some tremendous improvements, particularly on the parents’ side.”

The most recent rollout of the TLE features an easy-to-use parent portal, which enhances communication and collaboration between school staff and families.

“It allows families to stay engage in their child’s academic and social progress, all from the click of their home computer,” said Thomas. “It’s not supposed to replace in-person parent involvement, it’s supposed to enhance it.”

The TLE allows teachers to create Personal Learning Plans (PLP) for their students, customizing what they need to work on at their pace. It helps has a collaborative parent conferencing tool, assists in identify student strengths and concern, document academic, social, emotional and note behavior goals and provides parents with a live view of their children’s grades. The TLE also has a comprehensive grade book, allowing teachers to record conduct grades and create progress reports, report cards and transcripts. It even has an attendance tracker and lunch count feature. Other features include easy access to explore Florida State Standards, unit and lesson planning, and standards mapping.

Currently, the TLE has more than 800 administrators, teacher and guardian active users. Educators, especially, are finding it a valuable tool.

Said Lilah Mills, principal at Masters Preparatory School in Hialeah:

“I really like the Personal Learning Plan, especially the conference feature. I think the format of the PLP [the elements of what the teacher is doing, what the student needs to do, and what the parent can do] really triangulates the responsibility between all three groups and provides accountability for the parents and teachers.My teachers think it is so user friendly: all the standards are pre-loaded and all of the resources are easy to access.”

Susan Gettys , lead educator at Broach School Tampa is also impressed with the TLE, especially the Personal Learning Plan.

“I love that the Personal Learning Plan tells us automatically if a student has mastered or passed or failed a specific standard based on their grades, since we can tie assignments to standards,” she said. “The customer service aspect has been amazing. Usually with a software program, you install it and never can reach anyone again. But with Step Up, I can always get help, and I love that you tweaked it based on our suggestions and needs.

“We teach multiple grade levels in a classroom, and students with multiple special needs, so the flexibility of this program makes it really viable for us as a special needs school.”

Thomas said she encourages scholarship parents to ask their teachers to use Step Up’s TLE.

“It really enhances and aids the learning experience for all parties involved,” she said. “It makes it easier for parents and guardians to communicate with their children’s teachers, received class announcements and really be in tune with what standards your child should be mastering and how they’re doing in school on a regular basis.”

Teachers, administrators, and guardians interested in using the TLE or learning about other Office of Student Learning programs, please click here to reach OSL staff.

Reach Lisa Davis at ldavis@sufs.org.

 

Step Up scholarship helps boost Ariely’s grades and confidence

By GEOFF FOX

Student-Spotlight_blog REseizedLinery Burgos’ voice cracked with emotion as she spoke about the academic progress of her oldest daughter, Ariely, a ninth-grader at the recently opened Cristo Rey Tampa High School.

Ariely Burgos, a freshman at Cristo Rey Tampa High School, wants to be an athletic

Ariely Burgos, a freshman at Cristo Rey Tampa High School, wants to be an athletic coach or PE teacher.

For years, Ariely has struggled with dyslexia, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Auditory Processing Disorder (APD), the last a condition that makes it hard for her to understand vocal tones or distinguish certain sounds.

“Some people think she can’t hear, but she can,” Burgos said of Ariely, who is 15. “Her brain just doesn’t always process what she’s hearing. Some sounds and words sound similar, so she can’t always catch if someone is being sarcastic or joking. It directly influences her reading fluency and that causes issues in school.”

Watching Ariely struggle through their neighborhood school tore at her mother’s heart. Imagine trying to learn how to read when some of the letters don’t look right and the words sound wrong.

“Sometimes, I’ll read words that aren’t even on the page and I’ll mix up sentences or skip sentences,” Ariely said.

Due to her challenges, Ariely often speaks in a soft voice and isn’t one to initiate conversation, but her smile can light up a room.

Burgos wanted to enroll her in a private Catholic school, where she could receive more attention in a Christian setting, but she and husband Jose Burgos couldn’t afford it.

Fortunately, as Ariely was about to enter third grade, her mother learned of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship managed by Step Up For Students. The family applied and Ariely was accepted. She enrolled at Tampa’s St. Joseph Catholic School for three years before transferring to Morning Star School, a private school that serves students with learning disabilities.

At Morning Star, Burgos said, the teachers worked “miracles” with Ariely.

“Step Up was great because we could get her in a school for learning disabilities,” Burgos said. “When she started sixth grade at Morning Star, she was reading on a third grade level. She is now reading on a high seventh-grade or low eighth-grade level. She still has difficulty, but she’s acquired a lot of different skills.”

Ariely said she enjoyed St. Joseph and Morning Star because of more individualized instruction, especially with reading.

“The teachers were really fun and that makes it easier to learn,” Ariely said. “They bring joy into the classroom. They were always cheerful and always caring.”

Morning Star Principal Eileen Odom said that while Ariely was struggling in a few subjects when she entered the school in sixth grade, she was obviously “very bright and spiritual.” Despite Ariely’s reading struggles, Odom said she excelled at math.

“I think she just needed an environment that was more student-centered,” Odom said. “She’s initially kind of shy and quiet. If I would get her to read something, she would talk in a real quiet voice, but if you provide her with some successful experiences she can rise to the occasion. We helped her realize she had strengths and could succeed. We spent the next three years trying to boost her up and give her confidence.”

It worked.

Ariely was eventually comfortable enough at the school to run for Student Council, star in Christmas plays, assist as an altar server and help with fundraising.

When it was time for Ariely to enter high school, Burgos didn’t hesitate to choose Cristo Rey, which opened in August 2016. She said the school’s Corporate Work Study Program was particularly appealing.

Through that program, Ariely now works at Step Up’s Clearwater office several times a month. In that capacity, she has written a story about herself for Step Up’s blog, helped create a video describing her school’s relationship with Step Up, which will be shown to the nonprofit’s board of directors, as well as paperwork and other duties.

“The opportunity to go into the workforce, and a professional workforce, that’s what sold me,” Burgos said. “These children will have an opportunity that is usually for students who are leaving college. That will pump up their self-esteem and give them networking opportunities they never knew were available. It can help them have a different outlook on life.

“They’re doing it for underprivileged kids because they need it the most. Hopefully, they won’t get stuck in the rut of leaving high school and just getting some job. For a lot of their parents, maybe that’s all they knew. This may help them see that, hey, I can go to college and make something better. That will help my family and anyone who comes behind me. Giving that opportunity to children who wouldn’t otherwise have it is a blessing on its own.”

While Cristo Rey serves only low-income students, it is choosy about who is enrolled. Students must be able to maintain a C grade point average and be able to do college preparatory work.

Cristo Rey is already one of Step Up’s Success Partners, meaning it participates in a two-year comprehensive professional development program that is free to all schools serving Step Up scholars. Success Partners is grounded in current research that directly correlates student success with parent involvement regardless of economic, racial, ethnic or educational backgrounds .At Cristo Rey Principal Jim Madden said Ariely already seems comfortable. She made all A’s and one B in the first semester.

“Ariely is very quiet, but very observant,” Madden said. “She takes in everything around her. She tries hard and has already been having success in the classroom and social environment.”

Burgos said her family is thankful for the scholarship, and not just for Ariely. Her younger daughters, Linery, 13, and Jolie, 6, also have received tax-credit scholarships to attend Villa Madonna Catholic School in Tampa. Linery has been on the scholarship seven years, like Ariely, and Jolie for two.

“We are eternally grateful for these opportunities,” Burgos said. “This was a dream come true. Without Step Up, we couldn’t put our kids in Catholic school and give them the education we think they need. That’s one thing in life people can’t take from you. People can hurt you and break your heart, but no one can take away what you’ve learned.”

Reach Geoff Fox at gfox@sufs.org.

 

 

 

 

 

My Story: Ariely Burgos

By ARIELY BURGOS
My story blog

 

My name is Ariely Burgos and this is my story.

I was born in Belleville, New Jersey and when I was little, I moved to Tampa, Florida. I moved to Florida in between the time I was baptized and when my little sister was born.We are 15  months apart. She’s been by my side all of my life. She is my best friend.

My first school was Sam Rampello Magnet school in downtown Tampa. I started in kindergarten there and my last year there was in second grade. My sister and I both went there, but my sister was in a grade below me. I went to that school for three years. We changed schools because my mom was talking to the priest at my church and he told her about the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship through Step Up For Students. He told her she should apply to see if she would qualify, and she did. We went to St. Joseph’s Catholic School in Tampa where I started  in third grade. I was more nervous than ever.Ariely Burgos

That year, I realized how shy I could be. At school, I did not talk to anyone and when I spoke no one heard me because I was so quiet. No one noticed me. The only person I talked to was my sister at lunch. My sister was – and still is – a confident, social and outgoing person. She is sassy and she is not afraid to speak her mind. My sister and I are complete opposites. She always made friends on the same day. My favorite part of attending the same school as my sister was that she always had my back no matter what. It was a little hard being social, but that was the least of my worries for what was next to come.

When I was in fourth grade, I was really behind with my reading, and I really struggled. I went to therapy. I had a therapist named Ms. Jen, and she was so much fun. She helped me with my homework and other schoolwork. We made real progress and one day she asked me to do this quiz. She said it was to see if I have dyslexia so I said, “OK. Why not?” I took it and the test showed that I have dyslexia. I knew I had memory problems, but this was a completely new level. It explains why it took me three hours to do my homework in fourth grade. It made me feel different, so I had to go in for more testing.

I found out I also have Auditory Processing Disorder and Attention Deficit Disorder, or ADD. I tried another year at St. Joseph’s and I was just struggling more. I stayed up really late doing homework; I got stressed out a lot, and I stared to get bad headaches. Nothing was helping me! I really didn’t know want to do. Ms. Jen recommended a new school that would help with everything.  So, I changed schools again. I finished my fifth grade year at St. Joseph’s.

The next year, I went to Morning Star Catholic School in Tampa. Again, I was nervous ever. I went without my sister to this school. I made it through the first couple of hours, then on our break between classes, I could no longer be strong and I cried. I cried because I was in a new school without my sister; I missed being with her and I was going to miss my youngest sister going to preschool. I was scared my sisters would think I was different, and their friends would think I was different because I went to a different school. So, I cried, and then a girl in one of my classes noticed me and I told her why I was crying. She reassured me that I would be OK. I was starting to like this school and it was easy for me to fit in. I made friends and I was more outgoing. I loved how all the teachers cared about me and made learning fun.

My sixth and seventh grades were amazing. My eighth grade year was fun, too, but an event happened that changed the way I looked at life. At the beginning of that year, I looked at life with happiness and joy. I never even saw any darkness; I believed in light. I was so excited when I found out who my homeroom teacher because I had her the last year for religion and she was,  and forever will be, my favorite teacher. In November of that year, as we got ready to leave for our Thanksgiving break, she said would be out for a while because of medical issues, but back before the Christmas play. She said not to worry, so I didn’t. But she didn’t get to come back  at Christmastime.  She was in and out the hospital a lot. She came back to the classroom once or twice.

We didn’t see her for a while and my class was worried. She loved us as if we were her own children. All the teachers told us that she would be OK , but she wasn’t. In April, we got a note that went home saying she had died. I was devastated. She was the only person that I ever knew who passed away. At that moment, my mind was not filled with joy or happiness, but with despair and darkness. At that moment, all of my inner-joy was gone. I was not happy about life; I was not looking forward to anything in the future. I was just hurt. I still went on, though.

I decided to just keep it all inside. That didn’t help at all. I put on a happy face for everyone, but inside I was hurt and didn’t know what to do. After a while, I decided to talk to the guidance counselor. I really just needed to talk and she understood that. I began to feel OK. That lasted until I had to choose high schools. I wanted to choose a high school that was right for me and I could fit into just fine. In the end, my mom decided for me because I couldn’t. She decided on Cristo Rey Tampa High School.

It’s a school that gives you an opportunity. It gives you job experience and it comfortably became my new high school. I just started at the school this fall, but I really like it. I am glad my mom chose it. It is a good school and I really recommend it. As part of the learning,  the school gives you an off-campus job and you work there once a week. I work  Tuesdays at Step Up For Students, where my scholarship comes from, It’s so much fun. Everyone is welcoming and friendly; they all are willing to help you when you need it.  I like working at Step Up and learning more about things that happen in the real world and getting really good experience.

Editor’s note: We like having you at Step Up, too, Ariely. We’re so proud of you and how far you’ve come! We were first introduced to Ariely at Morning Star where we did a photo shoot for our annual report. We learned she wants to become an athletics coach. Here’s her photo in our Step Up For Students 2015-16 annual report with her wonderful smile: coach ariely page

 

PNC donates $2 million to Step Up For Students to provide 329 scholarships for local students

By PAUL SOOSTdonor corner

As part of PNC Bank’s $2 million donation to Step Up For Students, PNC hosted Atlantic Christian Academy’s 11th and 12th grade Advanced Placement economics class at their West Palm Beach offices. The class stopped by the office of Cressman Bronson, PNC’s regional president of Florida east. Pictured are (left to right) Alicia Gray, Headmaster Jim Rozendal, Neylena Hedmont, Josh Dubinsky, economics teacher Thomas Sanders, Jonah Arterburn, Michela Payne and Mardoshee Mercius.

As part of PNC Bank’s $2 million donation to Step Up For Students, PNC hosted Atlantic Christian Academy’s 11th and 12th grade Advanced Placement economics class at their West Palm Beach offices. The class stopped by the office of Cressman Bronson, PNC’s regional president of Florida east. Pictured are (left to right) Alicia Gray, Headmaster Jim Rozendal, Neylena Hedmont, Josh Dubinsky, economics teacher Thomas Sanders, Jonah Arterburn, Michela Payne and Mardoshee Mercius.

 WEST PALM BEACH – The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (NYSE: PNC), one of the largest diversified financial services institutions in the U.S., announced Wednesday a $2 million donation to the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program through Step Up For Students for 329 financially disadvantaged children in Palm Beach County.

The $2 million donation will be used for scholarships during the 2016-17 school year. This is the first time that PNC has partnered with Step Up For Students, which is funded by corporationhttp://www,pnc.coms with tax-credited donations. PNC’s contribution will fund K-12 scholarships, so lower-income children can attend the school that best meets their learning needs.

PNC Bank Community Development Manager Lucy Carr teaches the AP economics class from Atlantic Christian Academy about credit reports, identity theft and keeping up your credit score to buy a car, a home or get a job.

PNC Bank Community Development Manager Lucy Carr teaches the AP economics class from Atlantic Christian Academy about credit reports, identity theft and keeping up your credit score to buy a car, a home or get a job.

The donation was announced by Cressman Bronson, PNC’s regional president of Florida East, on Wednesday while Atlantic Christian Academy‘s 11th and 12th grade Advanced Placement economics class visited the bank’s local West Palm Beach offices. During their time at PNC, the students learned about monitoring credit scores, applying for school and car loans, as well as learning about the different lines of business that keep the engine of the bank humming smoothly.

“Our support of Step Up for Students is a strategic investment in the future of Palm Beach County children,” said Bronson.

“By easing the financial burden for parents with this tax donation, we’re supporting a solid foundation for the growth and success of our local children, their families and ultimately, our Florida economy.”

The program allows recipients to choose between a scholarship to help with private school tuition and fees, or a transportation scholarship to attend an out-of-district public school.

During the 2016-17 school year, Step Up For Students is serving nearly 98,000 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued up to $5,886 per student. More than 1,700 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

“We are truly grateful for the generosity and support of PNC. The positive impact they will have on 329 children this year alone is truly remarkable,” said Step Up For Students CFO Joe Pfountz. “PNC is a great partner, and on behalf of our families, we thank them for their generosity.”

 About PNC

The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. is one of the largest diversified financial services institutions in the United States, organized around its customers and communities for strong relationships and local delivery of retail and business banking; residential mortgage banking; specialized services for corporations and government entities, including corporate banking, real estate finance and asset-based lending; wealth management and asset management. For information about PNC, visit the website.

Wright Flood donates $1 million to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program

By PAUL SOOST

Wright

During Step Up’s Rising Stars Awards Ceremony in St. Petersburg, Wright Flood presented Step Up For Students a check for $1 million to go toward scholarships for the 2016-17 school year. Students who were recognized during the ceremony for excellence thanked the company’s representatives for their generosity.

donor cornerST. PETERSBURG – Wright Flood, the largest provider of federal flood insurance policies in the U.S., recently announced its largest contribution to date to the Step Up For Students Scholarship Program. Wright Flood’s $1 million contribution will provide 164 scholarships to financially disadvantaged Florida schoolchildren.

The contribution was announced during the Step Up For Students Rising Stars Awards celebration in Pinellas County. The event, hosted at St. Petersburg Catholic High School, recognized Step Up scholars, parents and teachers for their exceptional work during the 2016-17 school year. Students were able to thank Wright Flood executives and other donors attending the event. In 2016, the corporate community contributed a total $559 million for these scholarships, helping lower-income students throughout Florida realize their dreams of attending a private school that fits their educational needs.

Wright Flood has partnered with Step Up For Students since 2008, contributing $2,850,000, which has provided a total of 516 scholarships. Step Up is a nonprofit organization that helps administer the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship. The program is funded by corporations through dollar-for-dollar tax credited donations.

“Wright Flood is proud to donate annually to the Step Up For Students Scholarship Program and is impressed with the success of the students who participate,” said Patty Templeton-Jones, president of Wright Flood. “As a St. Petersburg company, we are so glad to see students in our home state benefit.”

During the 2016-17 school year, Step Up For Students is serving nearly 98,000 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued up to $5,886 per student. About 1,700 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide. Scholars may also choose a $500 scholarship to offset the cost of transportation to an out-of-district public school.

“We are always grateful to longtime corporate partners like Wright Flood who recognize the value of educational choice and who support our mission to ensure that all Florida students have access to learning environments that suit their individual needs,” said Doug Tuthill, Step Up For Students president. “We are grateful for Wright Flood’s continued support and for their commitment to the communities they serve.”

By GEOFF FOX

Ampy Suarez laughed heartily, while her husband Jose raised his eyebrows with a sigh. VDay2017

The couple, who run Hope Ranch Learning Academy in Hudson, Florida, have been married 34 years. The children of Cuban immigrants who came to Miami in the mid-1960s were asked about their first date, which involved an unfortunate rollercoaster ride at a fair in Miami. Rollercoasters did not agree with Jose, but he didn’t want to disappoint the girl who would become his bride.

So, he got on. He was woozy when the ride ended. So woozy, that, well … Somehow, the poise Jose showed in the aftermath forever warmed Ampy’s heart.

Nowadays, the Suarezes love their work as much as they love each other. The couple, who has three adult daughters and five grandchildren, serve 120 special needs students at Hope Ranch campuses in Hudson and Zephyrhills. About half of the students are on the Gardiner Scholarship for students with certain special needs; a scholarship managed by Step Up For Students.

One aspect of the academy’s curriculum includes equine interactions, which uses activities with horses to promote physical, occupational and emotional growth. Annually, the ranch
hosts a Horse Jamboree, and parents often get teary-eyed as they watch their child lead a 1,000-pound animal around the arena.

“ We just want to give them opportunities they never would have had otherwise,” Ampy Suarez said with a loving smile. And Jose beamed, too.

Reach Geoff Fox at gfox@sufs.org. 

A supportive environment made all the difference for this scholarship student

By JEFF BARLIS

Student-Spotlight_blog REseizedTatianna Mondesir used to pull her hair down over her face in class. She was trying to hide, trying to avoid being called upon to answer questions she knew she would get wrong.

“When I got a wrong answer, people would laugh at me,” said the normally vibrant girl with the long braids. “I didn’t understand as well as them.”

In her zoned neighborhood school, she was earning C’s, D’s and F’s in third grade and was in danger of being retained. She managed to scrape by, but her pediatrician had advice for her mother: Look into the Step Up For Students scholarship for low-income students. Consider a private school that might give Tatianna a better chance to learn and grow. Tatianna

The next year, at Abundant Life Christian Academy in Margate, Tatianna was still struggling and hiding behind her hair. But now no one laughed when she couldn’t produce the answers.

Tatianna Mondesir graduated from eighth grade at Abundant Life Christian Academy in Margate last spring.

This was the start of a transformation.

“The teachers and my classmates supported me,” said Tatianna, now a ninth-grader. “In fourth grade and fifth grade I struggled a lot, because I wasn’t on the same level as other kids. But I improved to getting C’s.”

Smaller classes, after-school tutoring, and extra attention from her teachers helped. But nothing made as big an impact, Tatianna said, as the compassion and encouragement she felt all around her.

Finally, she had hope, which began to turn into belief in herself.

“When she came to sixth grade, she was still a year behind,” said history teacher Laura Hennebery. “But she was really working hard.”

And wanting more. Quarter after quarter, Tatianna watched her friends go up on stage for an honor roll ceremony while she sat alone next to their empty chairs. She became obsessed with making honor roll, too.

At the end of the fourth quarter, she thought she was there. But when she and her mom, Karen, met with her math teacher, she learned she was short by a single point.

“I had a 79,” Tatianna recalled. “I was so happy! I thought she was going to round up, but she didn’t. My mom asked her if I could have extra credit so I could make the honor roll, but she wouldn’t let me. She said I should have done the extra credit that was available (during the school year). But I never did that, which was a mistake.”

Tatianna was upset at first. But her teachers continued to be supportive. And the next year, her determination kicked into higher gear.

She wrote down her goals for seventh grade: Work harder. Study more. Participate in class. Read more books. Do all the extra credit. Make honor roll.

Tatianna also changed her hairstyle, wearing a headband to hold her hair back. A beautiful smile emerged with her confidence.

To everyone around her, the change was obvious.

“When she first came to school and even through sixth grade, she was very quiet, kept to herself,” Ms. Hennebery said. “She just didn’t want anyone giving her any kind of attention. … You’d ask her a question and she would just shake her head, ‘No, I can’t do that. I don’t want to do that.’ ”

But now Tatianna was involved with school activities, participating in class – and meeting her goals.

She got all A’s and B’s and made honor roll all four quarters. At the end of the year, she was on stage shaking hands with principal Stacy Angier, who gave her a pin for induction into the National Junior Honor Society.

“When I walked onto the stage it was really cool, an incredible feeling,” she said. “I was really proud of myself.”

After finishing eighth grade at Abundant Life, Tatianna enrolled in her zoned, public high school. Her mom had lost her job in administration at a pest control company. So even with the Step Up scholarship, a private school was no longer financially possible.

Her new school is huge and fast-paced. But Tatianna said her goals are on track. She plans to go to college and become a lawyer – things she didn’t dare dream a few years ago.

Mom is confident, too. Tatianna’s first report card showed her falling just shy of honor roll, with all A’s and B’s and one C (in digital marketing). But it’s not like she hasn’t been here before.

Thanks to the scholarship, Tatianna was able to attend a school where “they really pushed her,” Karen said.

Now, she knows how to push herself.

Said mom, “I know she will be okay now.”

About Abundant Life Christian Academy

Started in 1990, Abundant Life Christian Academy is accredited by AdvancED and serves 445 PreK-8 students, including 237 on tax credit scholarships. The school uses a mix of curriculum – mostly BJU Press, Saxon Math in middle school, and some Abeka materials. This year, the MAP® (Measures of Academic Progress) test replaced the SAT as the school’s annual assessment test. Tuition varies per grade, from $6,600 to $7,300 per year. Abundant Life participates in Step Up For Students’ Success Partners program, a two-year comprehensive professional development program that is free to all schools serving Step Up For Students scholars. Success Partners is grounded in current research that directly correlates student success with parent involvement regardless of economic, racial, ethnic and educational backgrounds.The school also has access to the Teaching and Learning Exchange, a web-based, interactive tool featuring the State Standards, instructional strategies, parent and student interventions, while at the same time addressing social and behavioral issues. Abundant Life is also participating in a MAP® pilot program run by Step Up. MAP® is an adaptive computer assessment that informs educators as to what individual students are ready to learn and guides the teachers to revise their teaching based on student needs.

 

Victory: The fight against the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program is over; children prevail

By STEP UP FOR STUDENTS STAFF

On Jan. 19, 2016, 10,000 Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program supporters, clad in yellow shirts, marched in Tallahassee urging the Florida teacher's union to drop the suit against the program.

On Jan. 19, 2016, 10,000 Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program supporters, clad in yellow shirts, marched in Tallahassee urging the Florida teacher’s union to drop the suit against the program.

We have gratifying legal news to share. The Florida Supreme Court today rejected a final appeal, and the case against Florida’s 15-year-old Tax Credit Scholarship is officially over. Our students and parents won.

In 2014, the Florida Education Association and other groups challenged the program, arguing it steered money to private religious schools, and violated a provision in the state constitution that mandates a “uniform” public school system. The scholarships, they contended, were similar to school vouchers the high court struck down in 2006. But this time, the state prevailed, allowing tens of thousands of scholars to remain in the schools of their choice. The ruling was handing down early Wednesday, ending a long and tireless fight for Florida’s schoolchildren’s rights for education equality.

“Low-income parents and children in Florida have a great deal to celebrate today knowing that their access to school choice and a quality school will no longer be threatened,” John Kirtley, vice chairman of the American Federation for Children and Step Up For Students’ chairman and founder, said in a statement. “We would like to thank our coalition partners and allies in Florida who have worked tirelessly to defend the program and the children who rely on these life-changing scholarships. There should be no barrier preventing a child from reaching their full potential or receiving a world-class education, and we are thankful this meritless lawsuit has been resolved.”

Community and political leaders throughout the state have been applauding the decision, including Rev. R. B. Holmes of Bethel Missionary Baptist Church in Tallahassee, who helped lead the fight against the lawsuit. Said Holmes: “On behalf of all the scholarship children, their families and their clergy in the Save Our Scholarships coalition, I commend the state Supreme Court on their wise application of the law.”

Step Up For Students president Doug Tuthill added: “The court has spoken, and now is the time for us all to come together to work for the best interests of these children. We face enormous challenges with generational poverty, and we need all hands on deck.”

We know these legal proceedings over the past two-and-a-half years have created some angst among our families and supporters, and we hope you, too, will celebrate this ruling. The scholarship this year is serving 98,000 deserving students, and we expect even greater things ahead.

Faith Manuel, who has had three children use the scholarship, including her first son who was born when she was a teenager and is a senior a the University of North Florida, was overjoyed by the news.

“Almost one year after our Historic March on Tallahassee with Martin Luther King III, three days after we celebrated Dr. King’s legacy, we have such a tremendous victory for the students in Florida,” said Manuel, who was a speaker during that rally. “My children’s ability to choose the school which worked for them has made all the difference in their individual success as students. I’m so thankful that this program will have the ability to continue to make a difference for Florida’s students.”

Read updates on today’s Florida Supreme Court ruling here from redefinED.

 

 

 

 

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