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Does your child struggle at school? Step Up For Students can help

By ROGER MOONEY

Reading was a struggle for Maloni Lewis as a third grader. So was writing and math.

Her whole life was a struggle. Both parents were disabled. Her three older brothers had been to jail. They told their mom that going to school and being smart were not cool among the group they associated with.

Maloni’s mom was determined to end that cycle with her daughter.

Maloni Lewis turned her academic path around after receiving a Florida Tax Credit Scholarship managed by Step Up.

Renée Lewis found Seven Rivers Christian School in Lecanto, Florida, near their home. With the help of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship for lower-income families, she was able to afford the tuition at the pre-K through 12 private school. The scholarship is managed by Step Up For Students.

It took a few years, but Maloni eventually became passionate about her education. She played sports, and by her senior year of high school, her grade point average was 3.8. She left for college with the goal of becoming a nurse like her mom.

“Step Up For Students is a lifeline,” Renée said. “It allows kids and families to dream. What they thought was so far out of reach is possible.”

There are many reasons why children struggle in school. For some, the class size is too big, and they feel lost among the crowd. Others have certain special needs that cannot be fully addressed at neighborhood schools. Some kids are bullied. Some are hindered by language barriers.

And then there are those like Maloni, whose homelife is so challenging that school is not a priority.

Step Up can help.

Lower-income families can apply for the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship and the Family Empowerment Scholarship. Both scholarships are based on a family’s financial need, and both give families a choice to find a new learning environment for their child.

Parents use a single application for the scholarships and Step Up determines eligibility for either the tax-credit scholarship or the Family Empowerment Scholarship.

Click here to apply for an income-based scholarship.

Parents of children with special needs can turn to the Gardiner Scholarship.

This scholarship allows parents to personalize the education of their pre-K through 12 children with certain special needs by directing money toward a combination of approved programs and providers. A list of special needs covered by the Gardiner Scholarship is found here under “eligibility requirements.”

Click here to join the 2021-22 interest list for the Gardiner Scholarship.

Parents whose child is being bullied at a public school can apply for the Hope Scholarship.

In 2018, the Florida Legislature created the Hope Scholars to give relief for K-12 public school children from bullying and violence. The program provides families with financial assistance to send a child to an eligible private school, or to transport him to a public school in another district.

The Hope Scholarship, which is not based on a family’s income, provides families with financial assistance to send a child who suffered from a qualifying incident to an eligible private school, or to transport him or her to a public school in another district. The scholarship value depends on the grade level and county the family lives in.

Click here to view the 2020-21 Hope Scholarship award chart.

The transportation scholarship is worth up to $750 and can be used to attend any out-of-district public school with available space.

Click here to apply for the Hope Scholarship.

Step Up has managed more than 1 million scholarships in the 20 years since its inception. These scholarships have been life-changers for the students and their families.

“I felt completely blessed to even have the scholarship. I don’t know what I would have done without it,” said Pamela Howard, whose son, Malik Farrell, reaped the awards of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship.

Malik had been to four schools district schools in four years and repeated third grade after getting a report card filled with F’s.

Pamela learned of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship and moved her son to Potter’s House Christian Academy, a pre-K through 12 private school in Jacksonville, Florida.

Weeks after enrolling, Malik’s older brother was murdered. The teachers and administrators at Potter’s House rallied around Malik. They eventually gained Malik’s trust, and because of that, Malik’s grades turned into C’s. He was a solid B student during his final two years of high school. He graduated and attended college in Tennessee.

Pamela credited Potter’s House and the Step Up scholarship for her son’s scholastic turnaround.

“To see my son just completely turn around, there aren’t even words,” she said. “That he overcame these struggles and turned out to become the young man that he is, there are no words to even explain how proud I am of him.”

Roger Mooney can be reached at rmooney@StepUpForStudents.org.

Your child is being bullied at school? There is Hope

By ROGER MOONEY

The bullying at school began when Jordyn Simmons-Outland was in the second grade. He was punched and tripped by classmates. He was teased for his weight. He once told his grandparents that he wished he were dead. He eventually saw a therapist.

Jordyn Simmons-Outland is first recipient of the Hope Scholarship for bullied students.
Jordyn Simmons-Outland is first recipient of the Hope Scholarship for bullied students.

His grandmother, Cathy Simmons, complained to Jordyn’s teachers and administrators at the neighborhood school, but the violence continued. The last straw for Cathy occurred in 2018 when Jordyn was slapped by a classmate at the start of his fifth-grade year.

What does a parent do when their child is not safe at school?

Where do they turn when their cries of, “Help! My child is being bullied!” go unanswered?

Parents and guardians talk of being frustrated by what they see as inaction by teachers and administrators at their neighborhood school.

If they Google: “Scholarships for children who are bullied,” they find the Hope Scholarship for schoolchildren who have been bullied. It is managed by Step Up For Students.

The Hope Scholarship provides an escape for K through 12 students who reported being bullied or a victim of violence in a public school.

Click here to apply for a Hope Scholarship.

According to the Florida’s School Environmental Safety Incident Reporting System, more than 47,000 students in Florida reported being a victim of bullying during the 2015-16 school year. That’s a huge number, yet it’s only the number of schoolchildren who reported an incident. Many more suffered in silence.

In 2018, the Florida Legislature decided to address the staggering number of schoolchildren who are bullied each year by creating the Hope Scholarship.

“Hope is the best description. I keep thinking ‘There is hope. There is hope. There is hope,’” Cathy Simmons said.

The Hope Scholarship, which is not based on a family’s income, provides families with financial assistance to send a child who suffered from a qualifying incident to an eligible private school, or to transport him or her to a public school in another district. The scholarship value depends on the grade level and county the family lives in.

Click here to view the 2020-21 Hope Scholarship award chart.

The transportation scholarship is worth up to $750 and can be used to attend any out-of-district public school with available space.

The scholarships are funded by consumers who choose to redirect up to $105 of their motor vehicle purchase taxes to the program.

Who is eligible?

Any public school student in Florida who was a victim of a qualifying incident at a K through 12 school, a school-related or school-sponsored program or activity or was riding in a school bus or waiting at a school bus stop.

What is a qualifying incident? They include battery, harassment, hazing, bullying, kidnapping, physical attack, robbery, sexual offenses (including harassment, assault or battery), threat or intimidation and fighting.

Cathy Simmons began looking for a private school for Jordyn after he was slapped by that classmate. She came across Lakeview Christian School in Lake Placid, Florida, which is not far from their home. That’s where she learned about the Hope Scholarship, then in its infancy.

They applied, and Jordyn became the first student in Florida to reap the benefits of the scholarship. Upon entering his new school for the first time, Jordyn said, “I new it was going to be good.”

Click here to read Jordyn’s story.

That is the idea behind the Hope Scholarship. It provides an education choice to families so their children can benefit from safer, more inviting learning environments.

Jordyn made friends. He was one of six students picked to sing at the school’s Christmas concert. A teacher wrote on his first progress report that he was “a pleasure to have in class.”

Cathy couldn’t wait to tell others about the Hope Scholarship and how it changed her grandson’s life.

“Now there is peace,” she said.

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@StepUpForStudents.org.

Putting the ‘personal’ in training for those on the autism spectrum

By ROGER MOONEY

Reid Stakelum was tired when he entered Equally Fit in Tampa in the afternoon, a result, his mom said, of staying up a little too late the night before to watch the movie “Back to the Future” at a local drive-in theater with his family.

Fatigue can be a trigger for Reid, 17, who is on the autism spectrum and receives the Gardiner Scholarship managed by Step Up For Students. It puts “more stress on his body and his brain,” said Reid’s mom, Brittany. Add an hour’s worth of exercise, and Brittany was expecting an unproductive session for her son at the gym.

Reid Stakelum rides an exercise bike while trainer Mark Fleming watches. Both are on the autism spectrum.

She based that on experience. Reid had been a member at other gyms, and the trainers there, when facing a less-than-energetic Reid, often pushed him to work harder to shake off the lethargy. That method might work for some, but Brittany knows it does not work with her son.

But Mark Fleming, 32, who owns Equally Fit (formerly Puzzle Piece Fitness), is also on the spectrum. He understands Reid.

When Fleming realized Reid wasn’t physically ready for his typical Thursday afternoon workout, he made adjustments on the fly. Fleming eliminated some of the planned exercises, added more rest and recovery time and increased the weight or the repetitions of others. What had the potential to be a lost afternoon at the gym turned out to be a productive session.

“Mark totally gets it,” Brittany said. “He is totally self-aware. He was able to relate to Reid and get him to calm down. Mark made sure it ended with a positive, where in other gyms, it would have been, ‘Nope, you got to do it,’ and that doesn’t work for people with autism.”

Bringing back the ‘personal’ trainer

Fleming, who was raised in Tampa and attended private schools, has a bachelor’s degree in exercise science and a master’s in human performance from the University of Alabama. 

It was a natural progression from a youth spent playing sports, mostly basketball and football.

His first love was baseball. Family lore has it, Fleming could read a baseball box score before he could read a book. But his passion for the sport went away when a lack of hand-eye coordination prevented him from hitting a baseball. He moved on to basketball, but again encountered difficulty, because, he said, “my hands didn’t work the way they need to.”

“I had very limited physical skills,” he said. “But due to my fascination with sports, I was able to be determined enough to overcome those issues.”

In high school, Fleming played linebacker on the Cambridge Christian School’s football team despite weighing 145 pounds.

Fleming began working with a physical trainer when he was in middle school. “Traditional weight room stuff,” he said, with the emphasis on weight training.

“I greatly benefited from it,” he said, “because I gained confidence.”

But, he added, “Toward my junior year, I started to accept that I can’t do sports. What am I going to do? It took me a while to find exercise science. That parallel interest really helped me.”

Mark Fleming has a bachelor’s degree in exercise science and a master’s in human performance from the University of Alabama.

While in graduate school, Fleming said he started working in applied behavioral analysis as a behavioral assistant. He also became a volunteer coach for the Special Olympics.

He worked with children with autism in a school setting and saw those with fine motor and gross motor deficiencies go through occupational and physical therapy. On weekends, he saw the same deficiencies with the adults he coached at Special Olympics.

Many people on the spectrum have low muscle tone that can be improved with therapy but not corrected. It returns when they stop physical and occupational therapy.

Fleming learned there were few if any opportunities for these adults to stay active after they completed occupational and physical therapies.

Fleming had an idea. Already certified as a physical trainer, he decided he would work with those on the spectrum. But instead of emphasizing weight training, he would emphasize basic movements as a means of getting his clients physically active.

There is often stimming behavior – hand-flapping, rocking – but that is not exercise.

“When we’re dealing with autism, specifically, we’re dealing with a lot of sedentary behavior,” Fleming said. “Exercise helps pull kids out of that a little bit.

“A lot of these kids have gross and fine motor issues that need to be worked on. Those are where the starting points are. Let’s get these basic movement patterns down first and then we’ll get into the more complex as we go along.”

Fleming spent his first year as a physical trainer loading hurdles, resistance bands, sandbag style weights, soft medicine balls and steppers in his Honda Accord and driving to his clients, who were fanned out across the Tampa Bay area.

New client fills out a questionnaire, so Fleming can learn their objectives and their triggers. Are they sensitive to the florescent lights? He’ll turn them off. Noise? He’ll slow down an exercise if he hears a loud truck outside. Does their medication raise their body temperature when they are active? If so, Fleming will make the gym cooler during their session.

“You have to bring personal back into personal training,” Fleming said.

Bonding over Phineas and Ferb

Diane Carothers had taken her son, Mikey, to gyms that had classes designed for children. But those gyms played loud music and the lights were too bright. The trainers were loud and a little too enthusiastic for Mikey, who also used a Gardiner Scholarship through Step Up.

“I don’t think they would understand him,” Diane said.

 She learned of Fleming’s gym through a Facebook group for mothers who home-school special needs children. Like Reid Stakelum, Mikey, 13, is on the spectrum. And like Brittany Stakelum, Diane spent her first visit at Equally Fit filling out the questionnaire and answering questions about Mikey.

Diane said she immediately knew this was the gym for Mikey. The question was: Would Mikey feel the same way? The answer is yes, though it took a few visits.

Mikey and Fleming formed a bond over their shared interest in the video game Roblox and the animated TV series Phineas and Ferb. They discuss those two while Mikey rides an exercise bicycle, lifts his feet over small hurdles, lifts the sandbag style weights and performs squats and lunges.

Mikey has coordination issues. He will slouch if sitting too long. This sometimes causes him to fall out of a chair. But after attending twice-weekly classes for the past year, Diane said Mikey’s coordination has improved and he has more strength in his hands and core.

“It’s been great for my son,” Diane said. “I’ve tried to get him involved in sports, but he doesn’t do well in team sports, and he’s just not very coordinated. Having a personal trainer is great for him, and I think that might not be the case if it was just any personal trainer, but Mark is so good with him. He’s so patient and he’s low-key and he understands him. Mikey is just so comfortable with him.”

So comfortable that Mikey walks on the treadmill at home.

“The only reason he’s willing to do that is Mark encouraged him to do that,” Diane said. “He looks up to Mark as an authority on the subject whereas Mom is not.”

Equally Fit is located 40 minutes from the Carothers’ home in Port Richey. Toss in a 60-minute session to the nearly 90-minute roundtrip commute and that is quite a commitment to make twice a week.

“I do it because it’s really beneficial for Mikey,” Diane said.

Perhaps the biggest endorsement Diane can give Fleming is this: He is one of the few people she feels comfortable leaving Mikey with.

“I’ve always been the kind of mom who sort of hovers,” Diane said.

Initially, she sat in the gym’s waiting room and watched Mikey work out. Then Diane would remain in the car and watch from the parking lot.

Now, she can use that hour to run a quick errand.

“It’s a big thing because Mikey is so comfortable with Mark, and Mark is so competent and understanding that I know Mikey will be fine with him for an hour,” Diane said. “There are very few people that I can leave Mikey with for an hour without Mikey becoming uncomfortable or distressed and there are no other people that I trust to handle a situation where Mikey becomes distressed.”

Excited to work out

Brittany Stakelum knows her son, Reid, would rather stay home and read a book or play a video game. The sedentary lifestyle, she said, fits many who are on the spectrum.

“They have more to offer than that, but they haven’t been around the right people in their lives who actually believe in them and will encourage them and tell them they can do anything they want,” Brittany said. “Mark’s mission is to help my son and his other clients to live their best lives.”

Reid stretches before a workout.

Reid has a part-time job in a supermarket. He used to struggle lifting and carrying cases of water. Fleming showed him the proper way to lift by using his legs. Problem solved.

Brittany also teaches children with special needs. She called Fleming “a breath of fresh air” for his dedication to working with clients on the spectrum and his desire to help them live a life that includes a degree of activity.

Fleming knows his clients do not need the same training he received when he was in school. Fleming, after all, was on the football team.

“A lot of kids I work with aren’t into that stuff. They don’t need that,” he said.

But what they need is the right exercises to get them off the couch, to improve their coordination, flexibility and strength. To improve their confidence, too.

Reid serves as an ambassador for the gym. Fleming posts pictures of Reid’s workouts on the Equally Fit’s Facebook page. For that, Reid received a $100 American Express gift card.

“He’s trying to show each person with autism that their time means something as well.” Brittany said. “Not only is he a great personal trainer, but he’s a great businessman, and he’s a great advocate and a great role model, especially with teens.”

Reid said he enjoys doing leg lifts. He said he likes going to Equally Fit because Fleming is “patient and encouraging” and is helping Reid get stronger.

Like gyms everywhere, Fleming had to close his for a few months during the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic. He continued to work virtually with some clients. Others found it difficult to complete the exercises without being in the same room with Fleming.

Reid found himself slipping back to his sedentary lifestyle. He could not wait for the gym to reopen.

“Reid is actually excited to go,” Brittany said, “and I don’t ever remember my son being excited to work out.”

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Plenty of school choices for children with special needs

By ROGER MOONEY

At three months old, Joshua Sandoval was diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis complex, a genetic disorder where the body produces benign tumors.

The tumors are in his brain, and the medication needed to prevent daily seizures makes him fidgety. Staying focused during class can be a chore.

Joshua Sandoval and his mom, Nilsa.

Teachers at prior schools told Joshua’s mother, Nilsa, that her son had behavioral issues and struggled to finish assignments. In the words of one, Joshua was “unteachable.”

Nonsense, Nilsa said. Her son can speak two languages (English and Spanish), is an avid reader and has an extensive vocabulary for a child his age. Joshua, now 13, just needed the right academic setting.

Like many parents of children with special needs and learning disabilities, Nilsa searched for a school that could meet Joshua’s needs. She found one at LIFT Educational Academy, a private one-through-12 school in Miami Lakes, Florida, not far from their home.

LIFT is a psychology, tutoring and brain fitness center that helps children develop the brain skills essential for learning.

With the help of a Gardiner Scholarship managed by Step Up For Students, Joshua entered LIFT as a sixth grader during the 2019-20 school year.

After bouncing through six neighborhood schools since Joshua began first grade, Nilsa had finally found the right fit for her son.

There are a number of schools across Florida equipped to serve students with special needs. Many accept the Gardiner Scholarship, which allows parents to personalize the education of their children with certain unique abilities by directing money toward a participating school, a combination of approved programs and services, as well as other approved providers and resources. These include schools, therapists, specialists, curriculum, technology – even a college savings account.

Click here to apply for a scholarship for children with certain special needs.

Click here to find a list of schools that accept the Gardiner Scholarship.

Valentina Guerrero, who has Down syndrome, attends Morningside K-8 Academy in Miami.

This scholarship is for Florida students 3 years old through 12th grade or age 22, whichever comes first, with one of the following disabilities: Autism spectrum disorder, Muscular dystrophy, Cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, Phelan McDermid syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Spina bifida, Williams syndrome, Intellectual disability (severe cognitive impairment), rare diseases as defined by the National Organization for Rare Disorders, anaphylaxis, deaf, visually impaired, dual sensory impaired, traumatic brain injured, hospital or homebound as defined by the rules of the State Board of Education and evidenced by reports from local school districts, or three, four or five year-olds who are deemed high-risk due to developmental delays.

Click here to find a list of all rare diseases defined by the National Organization for Rare Disorders.

The Gardiner Scholarship is a boon to children with certain special needs and their families. You can read here about Julian, who has cerebral palsy, hydrocephalus and a severe hearing loss that has impeded his speech, and here about Ryan, who is on the autism spectrum, and here about Valentina, who has Down syndrome.

You can read Joshua’s story here, though there is a postscript. LIFT Educational Academy went virtual during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nilsa said Joshua did not respond well to that type of learning. So, she searched for another school that would fit his needs. In short time, she found one – Aktiv Learning Academy in Miami, which is also close to their Miami Lakes home and accepts the Gardiner Scholarship.

Nilsa said the transition was smooth.

“Joshua is going to an in-person school that is simply fabulous,” Nilsa said. “He is super happy and back to learning.”

Roger Mooney can be reached at rmooney@StepUpForStudents.org.

Moving education beyond the residential ZIP Code in Florida: Step Up provides choices

By ROGER MOONEY

School days meant a 5 a.m. wakeup call for Linzi Morris and her children so they could make the 40-minute ride across Tampa, Florida to their respective middle schools and high schools, passing more conveniently located options along the way.

Why?

Because Linzi wanted the best education opportunity for her six children.

“I looked at it as an investment, an investment in their future,” she said. “I can take the easier route, but I’m looking at it as I want them to get the best opportunity to do the best they can do.”

That’s the power behind the income-based and  special-needs scholarships managed by Step Up For Students. In Florida, parents are not tethered to their neighborhood schools even when personal funds won’t stretch that far. They have the flexibility to customize their child’s education and the freedom to send their child to a school outside their zone.

Saliyha and Qinniun are the youngest of Linzi’s six children to attend private schools with the help of income-based scholarships managed by Step Up.

Step Up offers the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship and the Family Empowerment Scholarship for those who meet the eligibility requirements found here, and the Gardiner Scholarship for those children with certain special needs who meet the criteria here.

Click here to apply for an income-based scholarship.

Click here to apply for a scholarship for children with certain special needs.

The scholarships are portable, too, meaning if the family moves to another part of the state, the scholarship moves with them to a participating school or approved providers and resources, as does their ability to choose the best education fit for their child.

Click here to find the list of schools that accept Step Up scholarships.

During the 2020-21 school year, nearly 100,000 economically disadvantaged schoolchildren attended one of the more than 1,800 private schools in Florida that accept Step Up’s income-based scholarships.

Since its inception in 2001, Step Up has funded 1 million scholarships.

Those scholarships were used at faith-based and non-denominational schools; schools that emphasized arts and science and schools designed for children with certain special needs.

Some parents favored small schools with smaller class sizes, so their child could have more one-on-one time with the teacher. Others sent their children to larger private schools, like St. Thomas Aquinas High in Fort Lauderdale, a Catholic school with a student population of more than 1,800.

Some parents found schools located close to home. Others, like Linzi Morris, set the alarm clock for 5 a.m.

Linzi sent all six of her children to Academy Prep Center, a private middle school in Tampa, because of its high academic standards. Her two oldest sons attended Jesuit High in Tampa, while her daughters and youngest son attended Tampa Catholic High.

Her three oldest children have graduated college. Another will graduate college in the spring. Her two youngest are still in high school.

The morning commute is long and slowed by rush-hour traffic. But to Linzi, it was worth the investment that comes with the freedom given to parents who uses the opportunity to choose the educational path for their child.

Roger Mooney can be reached at rmooney@StepUpForStudents.org.

Gardiner scholar is a Cystic Fibrosis pioneer: ‘We’re making science right now’

By ROGER MOONEY

Picture the Grand Tetons National Park in Wyoming with its majestic peaks and breathtaking vistas. Look closely and you might spot a moose under a bridge or a heard of bison off in the distance. Memories to last a lifetime, for sure.

Then 15, Faith Dunlap was there with her family in July 2018, ready to experience all the park has to offer.

Her favorite moment? Well, they did see a moose, and it was under a bridge. But that is hardly the biggest takeaway.

The lasting memory will be the phone call that reached the Dunlaps while they were in one of the park’s visitor centers. It was there where Faith learned she was accepted into a clinical trial for Cystic Fibrosis that had been approved earlier that year by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Faith describes herself as “very active and outdoorsy,” which helps her
combat Cystic Fibrosis.

If successful, the treatment would be a life-changer if not a lifesaver for those battling the disease that attacks the body’s organs, namely the lungs.

“It was,” Faith’s mom Deana said, “a great day.”

And while the Dunlaps cut short the vacation and hustled home to Melbourne, Florida, that memorable day with the Grand Tetons as the backdrop was followed by more great days.

The trial worked.

“It really changed what I’m able to do,” said Faith, now 17. “I can go out in public and feel safer, pre-pandemic, of course. A cold is just a cold now. It doesn’t land me in the hospital for two weeks with bilateral pneumonia, which is nice.”

A Cystic Fibrosis advocate

A month after that transformative phone call, Faith had another life-altering moment. She became a Gardiner scholar through Step Up For Students. Today, Faith is a high school senior who has been homeschooled her entire life. The scholarship helps pay for her tuition and books at Eastern Florida State College in Melbourne, where she is dual enrolled.

At 18 months old, Faith was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis. Her life is a steady stream of medication and twice-daily treatments (once in the morning and once at night) that include a nebulizer, inhaler and a percussion vest, an inflatable vest that vibrates at a high frequency to loosen mucus in the lungs.

Until Faith began the clinical trial in August 2018, her routine included trips to the hospital. Lots of trips. In 2016 alone she was hospitalized eight times with the average stay of two weeks. That’s one of the main reasons Deana and her husband, Rich, decided to home school their three children – to control the environment around Faith as much as possible.

For Faith, wearing a mask was a part of her life long before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Facemasks, hand sanitizers and social distancing were the norm for Faith long before anyone heard of COVID-19.

“When you have CF, every cold, not only do you get sick and get a lot sicker and stay sicker longer because it turns into pneumonia,” Deana said. “But CF is a progressive disease and every illness you get does some amount of permanent lung damage, so the more you have, the faster the lung damage builds up and the earlier you need a lung transplant.”

Faith is an advocate for opt-out organ donation, where donating is automatic unless a person requests otherwise. In the United States, people have to opt-in to have their organs donated. Faith explained why opt-out is so vital in a video she made last year for one of her college classes.

“In the CF community, people need a lot of organ donations, especially lung donations and liver donations less frequently, but lung donations are the big thing,” Faith said. “A lot of times there aren’t enough organs donated for everyone on the list.”

Making science

Cystic Fibrosis damages organs, namely the lungs and digestive system, by attacking the cells that produce mucus, digestive juices and sweat. These fluids become thick and sticky and clog passageways, usually in the lungs and pancreas.

It is an inherited disease, which can be caused by any one of a 1,000 gene mutations in the parents. Faith inherited a mutated gene from each of her parents. Having two is what qualified her for the clinical trial.

The life expectancy of those with Cystic Fibrosis increases with the advancement of treatments. According to a 2019 article in Medical News Today, prior to the 1980s, half of those with the disease did not reach their 20s. Today, most Cystic Fibrosis patients live into their 40s and lead active lives.

That’s why the clinical trial was important to Faith and to the Cystic Fibrosis community. If the treatment – a triple combination of drugs – worked, who knows how far they can extend the life-expectancy?

“(My future is) much less bleak,” Faith said. “We don’t actually know, because I’m in the first generation of patients to have access to these drugs. We’re making the science right now. We just don’t know, because there aren’t adults who got on these as teenagers and grew up with them. We’ll figure out what happens. It’s changed so vastly because of the access to this new life-saving medication that we don’t really know for sure. We just know it’s a lot better and has the potential for us to live normal lives.”

Faith (right) was visiting Grand Teton National Park with her family when she learned that she was accepted into the clinical trial. She is pictured here with her sister Grace (left) and brother William.

Being accepted to the trial was great news for Faith and her family. But there did remain one mystery: Was she going to be in the group that received the triple-combo of drugs? Or was she going to be in the placebo group?

“I’ve always followed the ‘hope for the best, prepare for the worst’ scenario,” Faith said.

She had her answer one month into the treatment when the result of a pulmonary function test was 107. Her results were normally in the 80s.

“I thought it was a fluke, so I did it again,” Faith said.

The result was above 100. She recalled one occasion when her result from that test reached triple digits, and that was when she was 7.

“I was in shock,” she said.

Faith knows of Cystic Fibrosis patients in the clinical study whose health improved so much they are no longer on the list for a lung transplant. In 2019, the FDA approved the triple combo drug for nearly all who have Cystic Fibrosis.

“This drug has been such a miracle for them,” Deana said. “It’s really changed the entire CF community as long as you qualify for it. But not everybody who has CF qualifies for it. It’s mutation-specific.”

Workout warrior

Keeping the lungs as healthy as possible is a key to combating Cystic Fibrosis. It helps to be as active as possible.

Faith is as active as possible.

She runs half-marathons (13.1 miles). She ran her first when she was 12. She has run nearly a dozen since.

She kayaks and surfs. She hikes and camps with her family.

Faith paddleboards in the Atlantic Ocean, which is 15 minutes from her home. She was preparing for the Crossing for Cystic Fibrosis in June, where participants cross the Gulf Stream from Bimini in the Bahamas to Lake Worth, Florida on standup paddleboards. It’s an 80-mile journey that Faith expected would take 15 to 18 hours to complete. The event was canceled due to the pandemic but is rescheduled for June 2021.

Faith was named the CF Workout Warrior for June by the Team Boomer, Fighting Cystic Fibrosis. The charity is run by former NFL quarterback Boomer Esiason, whose son, Gunner, has Cystic Fibrosis.

“I’m very active and outdoorsy,” she said.

Faith wants to be a marine biologist. She works part-time at the Florida Wildlife Hospital and Sanctuary near her home.

She loves penguins and dolphins.

“I have a particular soft spot for marine mammals,” she said. “I also love sharks and think that they are vastly misunderstood.”

Thanks to new medication that Faith helped pioneer, her future is, as she said, “less bleak.” She looks forward to a long, normal life.

“We had hope that it was going to change her life,” Deana said. “I don’t think any of us fully expected it to be as good as it is.”

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Step Up For Students partners with NLP Logix to build next generation ESA platform

Step Up For Students was founded to empower families to pursue and engage in the most appropriate learning options for their children, with an emphasis on families who lack the information and financial resources to access these options. Over the years, Step Up has developed internal systems and procedures to administer these scholarships, which disproportionally benefit minority children and families, but now they are expecting exponential growth in demand.

“Even before COVID,” said Doug Tuthill, President, Step Up, “we were expecting to grow from administering $700 million in scholarships to over $1 billion. But now, families are having to supplement their children’s education at home and/or through neighborhood pods, which has increased the need for parents to have access to more scholarship funds, and more flexibility in how these funds are spent.”

To support their mission and growth, Step Up has turned to NLP Logix, a Jacksonville, Florida-based machine learning and artificial intelligence company, to integrate and build the platform the parents can use to manage their children’s education. The platform is incorporating high levels of artificial intelligence to provide such things as course recommendations, educational product purchase recommendations, charter school options and other applications to help users interface with their scholarship benefits.

“We are very proud to have been selected by Step Up For Students to partner in this endeavor,” said Ted Willich, CEO, NLP Logix. “Having an opportunity to support transforming the K-12 education system in America is something we could have only dreamed of when we started NLP Logix ten years ago.”

Step Up For Students and NLP Logix expect to launch the platform in December of 2021 with an extensive roadmap of enhancements to come in the following years.

The platform will first be used by parents and students within the State of Florida who are enrolled in the five scholarship programs administered by Step Up: Florida Tax Credit Scholarship (FTC) and the Family Empowerment Scholarship (FES) for lower-income families, The Gardiner Scholarship for children with certain special needs, the Hope Scholarship for public school students who are bullied or victims of violence and the Reading Scholarship Accounts for public school students in third through fifth grade who struggle with reading.

Step Up ranked 21st in Forbes annual list of top 100 charities

By ROGER MOONEY

Step Up For Students continues to rank among the top 25 nonprofits in the country, coming in at 21st in Forbes’ list of America’s Top 100 Charities 2020.

Step Up, a Florida-based scholarship funding organization serving more than 120,000 students annually, was No. 1 among education charities.

This is the fourth year that Step Up has been included in the Top 25 of Forbes’ 22nd annual list of America’s top charities.

“This honor is bestowed on our organization because of the amazing generosity of our donors who believe in our mission of delivering educational opportunities to Florida’s most vulnerable students,” said Anne Francis, Step Up’s vice president of development. “This ranking is particularly special this year because we just celebrated the delivery of our 1 millionth scholarship. The children whose lives are changed by these scholarships are the heart and soul of Step Up.”

The nonprofits that comprise the Top 100 received $49.5 billion in donations during the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2020. That is 11% of the estimated $450 billion raised by the more than 100 charities in America.

Step Up received $618 million in donations during the 2019-20 fiscal year.

In addition to the recognition from Forbes, Step Up received a coveted four-star ranking from Charity Navigator, the nation’s top charity evaluator. It is the 14th time Step Up received Charity Navigator’s highest ranking.

In a letter to Step Up, Charity Navigator President Michael Thatcher wrote, “Attaining a 4-star rating verifies that Step Up For Students exceeds industry standards and outperforms most charities in your work area.”

Step Up ranked 18th in the Chronicle of Philanthropy most recent list of Top 100 nonprofits and has received GuideStar’s Platinum Seal of Transparency.

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

His cleats, our cause

By ROGER MOONEY

Former University of Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel is creating some buzz for Step Up For Students this month during the NFL’s My Cause My Cleats campaign.

Driskel, a member of the Denver Broncos, had Step Up’s logo emblazoned on a pair of his cleats in support of the nonprofit scholarship funding organization based in Florida.

Driskel, who grew up in Oviedo, Florida, partnered with Step Up over the summer in an effort to combat racial inequity.

“That’s why I support education choice,” Driskel wrote in an op-ed piece that ran in The Gainesville Sun in August. “Education can be one of the great equalizers in society, and equalizing opportunities is fundamental to finding the learning environment that works best for each child.”

My Cause My Cleats was started by the NFL players in 2016. They showcase foundations or nonprofit organizations they support by having logos and slogans on their cleats during this annual event. The cleats are auctioned off with the proceeds to benefit the players’ selected charities.

All proceeds from the auction of Driskel’s cleats will go directly to Step Up. They are available at Denver Broncos Charities. The auction began Dec. 1 and ends Dec. 18.

“We are honored that Jeff chose to support Step Up in our mission of creating equal education opportunity for children,” said Lesley Searcy, Step Up’s Chief External Relations Officer.”With 150,000 Step Up scholars, I think the Broncos just got a lot more fans!”

The Broncos players will wear their personalized cleats during Sunday’s game against the Kansas City Chiefs.

Driskel will support Step Up on his social media platforms and other partnership initiatives.

“I’m a quarterback, so I naturally believe in being aggressive and going on the offensive,” Driskel wrote. “On the field, you need as many options as possible to succeed in any situation. Similarly, education choice attacks inequality by providing parents with multiple ways to find the setting that best meets their children’s needs.”

Step Up manages five scholarships for pre-K-through-12 schoolchildren. Two are income-based: the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship and the Family Empowerment Scholarship. The Gardiner Scholarship serves children with certain special needs. The Hope Scholarship is for schoolchildren who are bullied in public schools. The Reading Scholarship Account is for public schoolchildren grades three through five who have trouble reading.

Driskel played four seasons at the University of Florida before finishing his career as a graduate transfer at Louisiana Tech. A sixth-round draft pick in 2016 by the San Francisco 49ers, he has played for the Cincinnati Bengals and the Detroit Lions before joining the Broncos last March.

Roger Mooney, marketing communications manager, can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Amerisure donates $350,000; helps lower-income students in Florida have access to education choice

By ASHLEY ZARLE

Amerisure, one of the nation’s leading providers of commercial insurance, has announced a $350,000 contribution to Step Up For Students, helping more than 49 Florida schoolchildren attend a K-12 school that best fits their learning needs.

Since partnering with Step Up, Amerisure has generously funded 323 Florida Tax Credit Scholarships through contributions totaling more than $2.2 million. This income-based scholarship program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and gives lower-income students in Florida the opportunity to attend a private school or assists with transportation costs to an out-of-district school that best meets the scholar’s learning needs.

Tax credit scholars like Gabriella Bueno, a 2020 graduate of Boca Raton Christian School, is now studying at Florida Atlantic University and pursuing a pharmaceutical career.

“When my parents made the decision to enroll me in a private Christian school they soon realized they could not afford the tuition, but they believed this was the best fit for me. Then they were blessed with the knowledge that they could pursue their choice of education for their children – all three of us – through the financial assistance and support of Step Up,” she said shortly before graduating.

“I truly believe that Step Up helped in motivating myself to be the best student I could be. I was the Student Council Secretary, the girls’ varsity basketball captain, and the National Honor Society President, and I was also involved in various other clubs at my school. I have much to be grateful for and I would personally like to thank Step Up For Students, the lawmakers who believe in education choice and the donor who support it. You have all allowed me to attend what I believe has been the best school for me and has helped shaped me into the person I am today.”

Just like Gabriella, schoolchildren throughout Florida are benefiting from the scholarship they receive through Step Up For Students, a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program.

“Enhancing our communities and participating in outreach programs is a large part of the Amerisure service culture,” said Greg Crabb, Amerisure President and CEO. “We are committed to supporting nonprofit organizations that enhance the lives of people in communities touched by Amerisure, our agents and our policyholders and believe our partnership with Step Up for Students does just that.”

During the 2020-21 school year, nearly 100,000 K-12 Florida students are benefiting from an FTC scholarship managed by Step Up.  About 57% of these scholars are from single-parent households and nearly 68% are Black or Hispanic. The average household income of families accepted to receive scholarships is $25,755 – a mere 9% above poverty. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

“We are excited that Amerisure has partnered with us to provide educational options for lower-income families in Florida,” said Doug Tuthill, president of Step Up For Students. “Because of their support, deserving students can access the school that best fit their learning needs.”

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.