Welcome

Welcome to the Step Up For Students blog, “Stepping Beyond the Scholarship.” We’re excited to have you join us as we debut a new forum for our parents, teachers, students and advocates to connect with one another and share their personal experiences with the (income-based) Florida Tax Credit Scholarship and the Gardiner Scholarship for children with certain special needs.

We hope to be informative, sharing news about Step Up For Students, our scholarship application periods, participating schools and services, among other topics. We also aim to intrigue you with profiles about our scholarship recipients and their families, our partner schools, our program donors and partners.

In addition, we’d like to help answer your questions and provide a network of support for you as you navigate your child’s educational path. Which private schools accept the scholarships in your community? What combinations of therapies have helped your child with special needs? Is there a homeschool curriculum that really brings results? In the months ahead, we will feature guest bloggers, including parents and educators. We’ll also publish various series, such as a behind- the-scenes look at all things Step Up. We invite you, our readers, to become active participants.

We look forward to growing our blog, and taking this adventure with you. Thank you for reading.

Your friends at Step Up.

GEICO funds 1,041 scholarships for Florida’s underprivileged schoolchildren

By ASHLEY ZARLE

TAMPA, Fla.GEICO recently recommitted to supporting underprivileged K-12 schoolchildren in Florida by providing education options through Step Up For Students.

Step Up For Students administers the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. Through GEICO’s generosity, 1,041 financially disadvantaged schoolchildren will be provided the opportunity to choose between a K-12 scholarship that helps with private school tuition and fees or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public school.

GEICO has been a partner of Step Up For Students since 2010 and has contributed $33 million toward the scholarship program.

GEICO announced a $7 million contribution to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are Cristo Rey Tampa High School Principal Matthew J. Torano,  Step Up For Students Vice President of Development Jillian Metz, Step Up For Students Founder and Board Chair John Kirtley, Cristo Rey Tampa High School President & CEO Charles D. Imbergamo, GEICO Senior Vice President Pionne Corbin, and GEICO Associate Vice President Heather McIntyre. They are joined by Step Up scholars from Cristo Rey Tampa High School.

GEICO announced a $7 million contribution to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are Cristo Rey Tampa High School Principal Matthew J. Torano,  Step Up For Students Vice President of Development Jillian Metz, Step Up For Students Founder and Board Chair John Kirtley, Cristo Rey Tampa High School President & CEO Charles D. Imbergamo, GEICO Senior Vice President Pionne Corbin, and GEICO Associate Vice President Heather McIntyre. They are joined by Step Up scholars from Cristo Rey Tampa High School.

“GEICO is committed to giving back and making our communities stronger,” said Pionne Corbin, senior vice president of GEICO. “We recognize that each child is unique and as strong corporate stewards, we are confident that our investment in Step Up For Students will provide options to those who need it the most.”

“Companies like GEICO are transforming the lives of Florida’s lower-income students, and through their partnership, the program is producing measurable results,” said John Kirtley, founder, and chairman of Step Up For Students.  “Last year, the Urban Institute evaluated graduates of our program and found that students who are on scholarship for at least four years are more than 40 percent more likely to attend public Florida college. GEICO is a large part of this success.”

The celebration was hosted at Cristo Rey Tampa High School where several students benefit from a Step Up scholarship, and the curriculum boasts a work-study component to give students a competitive edge.  Representatives from GEICO and Step Up For Students gathered with a panel of scholarship students to hear how the program has impacted their visions for the future.

“Through the Step Up scholarship, I have been given the opportunity to attend Cristo Rey where I have access to the tools, I need to be successful,” said Armando Diaz, junior at Cristo Rey.  “I know colleges will look at my resume and see I’ve had four years of internships and experience and I’ll stand out from my friends.  I am dreaming for the future and hope to make GEICO and other donors to Step Up very proud.”

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that administers the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporate tax credits and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

For the 2018-19 school year, Step Up For Students is serving nearly 100,000 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued at up to $6,519 per student for kindergarten through fifth grade, $6,815 for sixth through eighth grade, and $7,111 for ninth through 12th grade. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company makes $4 million contribution to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program

By ASHLEY ZARLE

Step Up For Students announced recently a $4 million contribution to the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program from Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company (UPCIC), a wholly owned subsidiary of Universal Insurance Holdings, Inc.

The $4 million donation will fund 565 K-12 scholarships for the 2018-19 school year, so lower-income children can attend the school that best meets their learning needs. This is the second year that UPCIC has partnered with Step Up For Students and has contributed a total of $6 million to the scholarship program.

“We are grateful for corporate donors like Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company who are helping to provide educational opportunities for Florida schoolchildren,” said Joe Pfountz, chief financial officer of Step Up For Students. “The company’s generosity is crucial to the work our team does and shows just how much they really care about Florida’s kids and its future.”

On Dec. 4 Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company announced a $4 million contribution to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are UPCIC’s Regional VP of Marketing-Northeast/Midwest David Ahern, UPCIC’s Spokesperson and NFL Hall of Famer Dan Marino, UPCIC’s COO Steve Donaghy, UPCIC’s Vice President of Marketing Stacey Tomko, UPCIC’s Regional VP of Marketing-Southeast Derek Heard, UPCIC’s VP of Corporate Development & Strategy Rob Luther, and St. Joan of Arc School Principal Caroline Roberts. They are joined by several students from St. Joan of Arc School who are benefiting from the scholarship.

On Dec. 4 Universal Property & Casualty Insurance Company announced a $4 million contribution to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are UPCIC’s Regional VP of Marketing-Northeast/Midwest David Ahern, UPCIC’s Spokesperson and NFL Hall of Famer Dan Marino, Step Up For Students CFO Joe Pfountz, UPCIC’s COO Steve Donaghy, UPCIC’s Vice President of Marketing Stacey Tomko, UPCIC’s Regional VP of Marketing-Southeast Derek Heard, UPCIC’s VP of Corporate Development & Strategy Rob Luther, and St. Joan of Arc School Principal Caroline Roberts. They are joined by several students from St. Joan of Arc School who are benefiting from the scholarship.

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

“Universal is committed to giving back and empowering the communities that it serves to accelerate community opportunities and build the foundation for the next generation of business leaders,” said Sean Downes, chairman and chief executive officer for Universal. Dan Marino, UPCIC spokesperson, National Football League hall of famer and former Miami Dolphins quarterback made a special appearance and spoke to the schoolchildren at an event on Dec. 4 hosted by St. Joan of Arc School in Boca Raton, Florida.

“Having options and choice in where you go to school is important and I’m excited to see so many students here today who have access to the learning environment that best suits their individual needs,” said Marino. “We know that the education you receive will help propel you to do great things.”

For the 2018-19 school year, Step Up For Students is serving more than 98,500 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued at up to $6,519 per student for kindergarten through fifth grade, $6,815 for sixth through eighth grade, and $7,111 for ninth through 12th grade. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Caldwell Trust Company celebrates 25th anniversary and continued support of Step Up For Students

By ASHLEY ZARLE

Caldwell Trust Company, an independent trust company with more than 25 years of investment experience and one billion dollars in assets under management recently announced a $30,000 contribution to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program for the 2018-19 school year.

Caldwell Trust has been a partner of Step Up For Students since 2011 and has contributed a total of $220,000 towards the scholarship program. The company’s contribution over the years has funded 40  K-12 scholarships so lower-income children can attend the school that best meets their learning needs.

“At Caldwell Trust, we consider it our civic duty and privilege to contribute to our community both as a company and as individuals,” said R.G. “Kelly” Caldwell, Jr., president and CEO of Caldwell Trust Company.  “We are proud to partner with Step Up For Students and support the unique learning needs of Florida schoolchildren.”

Caldwell Trust is also celebrating its 25th Anniversary this year and Step Up scholars and parents from Epiphany Cathedral School in Venice, which serves more than 250 Step Up students, wanted to thank the company for its support.

On Nov. 29, they visited the company headquarters and presented 25 handwritten thank you cards to Caldwell Trust associates in recognition of the milestone anniversary. Students, parents, and Epiphany Cathedral administrators had the opportunity to share their personal experience about the importance and impact of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship program.

“Our school wouldn’t be what it is today without Step Up For Students,” said M.C. Heffner, principal of Epiphany Cathedral. “We are so thankful that these deserving students can attend our school, who without the scholarship wouldn’t be able to.”

On Nov. 29 Caldwell Trust Company celebrated its’ cumulative contribution of $220,000 to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are Epiphany Cathedral School Principal M.C. Heffner, Caldwell Trust’s President and CEO R.G. “Kelly” Caldwell, Jr., and Step Up For Student’s Development Officer Cheryl Audus. They are joined by several students from Epiphany Cathedral who are benefiting from the scholarship.

On Nov. 29 Caldwell Trust Company celebrated its cumulative contribution of $220,000 to Step Up For Students. Pictured (adults from left to right) are Epiphany Cathedral School Principal M.C. Heffner, Caldwell Trust’s President and CEO R.G. “Kelly” Caldwell, Jr., and
Step Up For Student’s Development Officer Cheryl Audus. They are joined by several students from Epiphany Cathedral who are benefiting from the scholarship.

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

 “We are thrilled that Caldwell Trust has once again committed to helping us provide educational choices for students who otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity,” said Doug Tuthill, Step Up For Students president. “We are grateful for our partnership and for all they are doing to give back to their community.”

For the 2018-19 school year, Step Up For Students is serving more than 98,500 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued at up to $6,519 per student for kindergarten through fifth grade, $6,815 for sixth through eighth grade, and $7,111 for ninth through 12th grade. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Dairyland increases contribution to $600,000 to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program

By ASHLEY ZARLE

Dairyland, a member of the Sentry Insurance Group of companies,  recently announced a $600,000 contribution to Step Up For Students, helping Florida schoolchildren attend the K-12 school that best fits their learning needs.

Dairyland Regional Agency Sales Manager, Nick Marsh, and Agency Sales Manager, Amber Driggers, presented Step Up For Students development officer David Bryant with a $600,000 check. The donation will fund nearly 90 K-12 scholarships for the 2018-19 school year through the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program, which serves lower-income children in Florida.

This is the third year that Dairyland has partnered with Step Up For Students and has contributed a total of $1.2 million towards the scholarship program.

“We are proud of the impact we’ve had on Florida schoolchildren through our contributions to the Step Up For Students Scholarship Program,” said Pete Anhalt, president of Dairyland.  “Dairyland takes pride in helping our communities become better places to live and work and we know this partnership is doing just that.”

Dairyland Regional Agency Sales Manager, Nick Marsh, and Agency Sales Manager, Amber Driggers, presented Step Up For Students development officer David Bryant with a $600,000 check

Dairyland Regional Agency Sales Manager, Nick Marsh, and Agency Sales Manager, Amber Driggers, presented Step Up For Students development officer David Bryant with a $600,000 check

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

 “We are honored to have Dairyland as a partner in our mission to help lower-income Florida families access schools that best fit their children’s unique learning needs,” said Step Up For Students President Doug Tuthill about the Nov. 24 donation. “We are grateful for their generosity and their commitment to giving back to their community.”

For the 2018-19 school year, Step Up For Students is serving more than 98,500 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued at up to $6,519 per student for kindergarten through fifth grade, $6,815 for sixth through eighth grade, and $7,111 for ninth through 12th grade. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Globe Life makes $25,000 contribution to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program

By ASHLEY ZARLE

Globe Life, the top volume issuer of ordinary individual life insurance policies in the United States, announced Dec. 17 a $25,000 contribution to Step Up For Students Scholarship Program for the 2018-19 school year.

This is the first time that Globe Life has supported Step Up For Students. The company’s contribution will fund three K-12 scholarships so lower-income children can attend the school that best meets their learning needs.

“Since 1951, Globe Life has believed in giving back to the communities in which we live and work,” said Corey Jones, Senior Vice President of Digital Marketing and Branding for Globe Life. “We strive to create opportunities to be a source of good to those around us and we are proud to support Step Up For Students to provide education opportunities for children in our community.”

Corey Jones, Globe Life Senior Vice President of Digital Marketing and Branding, right, presents David Bryant, Step Up For Students development officer, with a check for $25,000 which will fund three scholarships for lower-income Florida schoolchildren to attend the school of their choice through the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. .

Corey Jones, Globe Life Senior Vice President of Digital Marketing and Branding, right, presents David Bryant, Step Up For Students development officer, with a check for $25,000 which will fund three scholarships for lower-income Florida schoolchildren to attend the school of their choice through the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program
.

Step Up For Students is a nonprofit organization that helps manage the income-based Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program. The program is funded by corporations with tax-credited donations and allows parents and students to choose between a K-12 scholarship to support private school tuition and fees, or one that assists with transportation costs to out-of-county public schools.

 “We are honored to welcome Globe Life as a supporter of our mission to help lower-income Florida families access schools that best fit their children’s unique learning needs,” said Doug Tuthill, Step Up For Students president. “We are grateful for their generosity and their commitment to giving back to their community.”

For the 2018-19 school year, Step Up For Students is serving more than 98,500 students throughout Florida with tuition scholarships valued at up to $6,519 per student for kindergarten through fifth grade, $6,815 for sixth through eighth grade, and $7,111 for ninth through 12th grade. More than 1,800 private schools participate in the scholarship program statewide.

Ashley Zarle can be reached at azarle@sufs.org.

Choice scholarship provided brothers an extended family

Preston, Linda, and Tyler McDonald.

By JEFF BARLIS

CLEARWATER, Fla. – Tyler McDonald, 19, and his brother Preston, 18, stand out in a crowd. Tall and athletic, their breezy, no-worries attitudes are as evident as the sparkle in their hazel-brown eyes.

They are All-American, boy-next-door types, the highest of achievers who say they wouldn’t be where they are now – Princeton and Duke, respectively – had it not been for Clearwater Central Catholic High School and the education choice scholarship that made it possible to attend.

Going to CCC was about much more than great academics.

They initially were raised in a comfortable middle-class home, never wanting. Everything changed seven years ago when their father left. The divorce was bitter and protracted. Their mother, Linda, would cry in her closet.

“She may think she hid it, but we could tell,” Tyler recounted with a twinge of sadness. “The toughest thing was there was nothing we could do about it.”

A couple of years before the divorce, Linda had stopped working as a nurse to take care of her mother, who was left paralyzed after an operation. During and after the divorce, she felt the sting of an extended unemployment she never planned. She needed a job with more flexibility and became a substitute teacher at the neighborhood middle school to be closer to her sons.

But it wasn’t enough. The three moved to smaller and smaller homes. The power and water were turned off on more than one occasion. Food shopping was for necessities only. Clothes shopping was once a year when the sales were on. Sports shoes and equipment had to last two years instead of one.

As they rallied around each other, help arrived in the form of a private school family that embraced and lifted them.

 

Sunlight cascades through the north-facing windows of the administration building at CCC. When visitors enter, they see the cheery, bespectacled face of front office manager Mary Weber. Her unofficial title is Director of First Impressions, and it only takes a moment to see why – she knows every one of the 500-plus students by name.

A warm, family feeling permeates campus.

That’s how it was for Tyler and Preston, when they each visited as eighth-graders and spent shadow days sitting in on a full slate of classes. CCC students grabbed every chance to talk to Tyler, asking as many questions about him as they answered.

“I shadowed at a nearby district school right before that,” he said. “It felt like I was just watching class. No one talked to me. It was a big difference.”

A year later, Preston got the same vibe at CCC.

“People were telling me the good stuff so that I would come,” he said. “It was really welcoming.”

 

Tyler, Preston, and Linda are a tight unit, a triumphant trio. They joke, tease, and finish each other’s sentences.

Born in the Bahamas and raised in Florida, Linda has a light accent and a modest, girlish giggle. It comes over her like a blush when she talks about her sons’ accomplishments.

After the divorce, anger and hurt were common but never affected Tyler or Preston at school. Linda had always pushed them gently to strive for straight A’s, and when they got the taste for it, they never looked back.

When it was time to choose a high school, there were public school magnets and International Baccalaureate (IB) programs in the mix. But it was the family feeling at CCC that made such an impression on those first visits – for the boys and for Linda.

“I remember going into (Director of Enrollment Tara Shea McLaughlin’s) office, knowing Tyler had really fallen in love with the school,” Linda said. “I was in tears because I didn’t know how I was going to afford this.”

McLaughlin spoke with the finance department. The school offered significant tuition assistance, but it wasn’t enough. They also helped Linda apply for the Step Up For Students scholarship that empowers low-income families to choose a private school.

It still didn’t cover everything.

“It was important to come up with a monthly payment that was not overwhelming, so she wasn’t in a panic every month,” said McLaughlin, herself an alumnus of CCC. “Any of us could be in the same situation. We saw the potential in those boys, so we needed to make it happen.”

McLaughlin also opened the school closet of gently used uniforms to Linda and got CCC’s uniform company to donate shoes to all of the school’s Step Up scholars.

Tyler McDonald’s senior portrait.

Preston McDonald’s senior portrait.

“It’s hard to compute the things they’ve done for my kids,” Linda said, recalling how she sometimes had to send Tyler to the finance office with a late check and an apology. “They were an amazing group of people. They nurtured my kids.”

Wanting to show her gratitude, Linda threw herself into volunteering. Despite working full-time as a public school teacher, she sold tickets and concessions at sporting events and helping with the school’s annual fundraising gala.

“Every CCC parent volunteers 15 hours, but Linda was in the hundreds of hours,” McLaughlin said. “She was everywhere.”

Tyler and Preston were enormously popular. They were sports stars who shined even brighter in the classroom. Tyler was valedictorian with an Ivy League future. Preston graduated at the top of his class with a full IB diploma.

“We’re beyond proud,” McLaughlin said, radiating like a parent. “We’re over the moon that they came here, and they will always be part of the CCC family.”

 

Today, Tyler is a sophomore football player majoring in economics at Princeton (which he chose over Harvard and Yale). He’s pondering careers in investment banking, private equity, corporate real estate, and management consulting.

In his first year at Duke, Preston wants to study computer programming and software engineering while getting a business certificate.

The boys stay in touch with each other mostly via text, at least three times a week. They’ve always been competitive and love to verbally spar over their IQs and now their colleges’ rankings. When they returned for the holiday, they cherished their time at home, together again.

Thanksgiving used to evoke dark memories.

“Right after the divorce, splitting every holiday was weird,” Tyler said. “Thanksgiving is supposed to be about family, but it’ll never be the same.”

This year, Tyler took part in “Friendsgiving,” a potluck set up by 15-20 CCC grads that’s been going on for three years. There was turkey, ham, green bean casserole, mashed potatoes, sweet potato casserole … all the trimmings.

“It started my senior year, just to hang out,” he said. “But it’s still running two years out of high school.”

“I don’t think we’d have that big a group or that cohesive a group if we had gone to any other high school.”

Indeed, after going to CCC, family will never be the same.

About Clearwater Central Catholic High School

Founded in 1962 with 96 students and seven staff members, the school graduated its first class of 26 seniors two years later. CCC, which is overseen by the Diocese of St. Petersburg, has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as a National School of Excellence. The 40-acre campus is a short walk from an inlet of Tampa Bay. The school is accredited by AdvancED and has 541 students, including 75 on Step Up For Students scholarships. CCC is an IB School with a 65 percent award rate in the full IB Diploma Program. The school also offers dual enrollment courses with St. Petersburg College as well as Advanced Placement (AP) Program courses for college credit. The PSAT test is administered to ninth and 10th graders. Tuition is $14,950 annually, and $12,400 for a family affiliated with a local Catholic parish. In 2017-18, CCC provided more than $425,000 in income-based tuition assistance to more than 25 percent of its families.

Jeff Barlis can be reached at jbarlis@sufs.org.

Raymond James a partner with Step Up from the start

By ROGER MOONEY

The partnership between Raymond James Financial and Step Up For Students goes back to the earliest days of the Step Up scholarship program.

It was 2001 and Tom James, then CEO of Raymond James, listened as Tampa businessman and Step Up founder John Kirtley laid out his vision for a means to provide low-income students in Florida with educational opportunities through corporate tax credit scholarships.

This struck a chord with James, whose wealth management and investment banking firm had long been an active investor in the communities it served, especially in the area of education.

“Listening to John, his message resonated with me,” said Tom James, who now serves as chairman emeritus at Raymond James Financial. “I knew he was passionate about helping underprivileged children, and this was an opportunity for Raymond James to invest in our community.”

Soon after, Raymond James Financial became a founding donor to Step Up For Students through the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program and the partnership has grown ever since. To date, Raymond James has funded 7,996 scholarships through contributions totaling more than $38 million.

“I am extremely grateful for the longstanding relationship with Raymond James,” Kirtley said. “Our partnership has allowed thousands of Florida schoolchildren to have access to the school that is most appropriate for their needs, which will allow them to be successful in life.”

Paul Shoukry

In 2018, Raymond James’ partnership with Step Up grew even stronger with the addition of Paul Shoukry, senior vice president of finance, treasurer and head of investor relations, to Step Up’s Advisory Board.

Impacting the direction of a student’s life is what attracted Shoukry to join Step Up’s Advisory Board.

The Advisory Board is comprised of business leaders who strategically advise and assist Step Up, giving their personal time to help ensure the success of Step Up.

“Education has always been an area that I would say is of significant importance to our community, because that is where you can change the trajectory of people’s lives, of children’s lives, as they become adults and make a long-lasting impact to the community,” Shoukry said.

Shoukry has seen this impact firsthand at Step Up events where he’s met scholarship students.

At one event, Shoukry met a high schooler with a familiar story: The young man had struggled in his previous school. His grades were poor. He was ineligible to play sports.

“Step Up enabled him to go to another school where everything turned around for him in his life,” Shoukry said. “He went from what was likely a story of another high school dropout to someone who is in college now.”

The 2001 vision for how the tax credit scholarship program could change lives has been realized. Through the support of Raymond James and other donor companies, Step Up is providing K-12 scholarships to nearly 100,000 lower-income students across Florida this year.

“Our biggest challenge now is to continue the momentum we’ve built through the years so that we can reach more students,” says Kirtley.

That’s what Shoukry is trying to help.

“Tom paved the way in creating this partnership,” said Shoukry. “I’m honored to represent Raymond James on the Advisory Board, and I’d like to help other companies see the value that Step Up is giving to children in Florida.”

Marketing Communications Manager Roger Mooney can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Calling all Florida Tax Credit Scholarship renewal families: Applications now open

By JUDITH THOMAS

Florida Tax Credit (income-based) Scholarship parents, we have great news for you. 

 You can now apply for a scholarship for the 2019-20 school year. You are a renewal family if your child is using a Florida Tax Credit Scholarship for the 2018-19 school year.  

 Renewal families will have processing priority until Jan. 31, 2019. If you apply on or after Feb. 1, 2019, you lose your priority status over new applications. 

Apply here.

 Don’t delay. Applications are processed on a first-come, first-served basis in the order all required documents are received. Funds are limited, so the sooner you apply and submit all supporting documents, the faster and more likely you are to secure your child’s scholarship for the upcoming school year. 

 Processing times vary depending on the volume of applications received and can take up to eight weeks in some cases. Check your email for more information or use the chat on our website to contact us. Watch this helpful application checklist video today:


 

If you’re currently waitlisted for the Florida Tax Credit (income-based) Scholarship, make sure you’re on the interest list to be notified when we’re opening applications for new families for the 2019-20 school year here.

Gardiner scholar’s high school experience the stuff of his mom’s dreams

By ROGER MOONEY

Nicolas Ratliff-Batista is a senior at Monsignor Pace High School in Miami Gardens with a 4.5 GPA and an armful of academic awards. He’s a member of the National Honor Society and is headed to Broward College to study environmental science.

He recently played Sigmund Freud in the school’s production of “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot.”  He has participated in other plays and also dressed as a cheerleader for the Girls Powder Puff football game during Homecoming week. You will find him at all the school dances.

“I (am) part of all sorts of things,” Nicolas said. “It’s a great high school experience.”

Nicolas Ratliff-Batista, a senior, has won more academic awards than he can carry during his four years at Monsignor Edward Pace High School

A parent’s dream, right?

“Exactly,” said Phyllis Ratliff, Nicolas’ mom. “The same as every parent would want for their child whether they have learning differences or not, and we are blessed to have found it at Pace and to be a recipient of the Gardiner Scholarship.”

***

Four years ago, thoughts of Nicolas attending high school was a nightmare for Phyllis.

Diagnosed as high-functioning autism at age 3, Nicolas was able to navigate his way from kindergarten through eighth grade in a familiar setting. Same school. Same classmates. Same teachers. Same administrators.

Because the school near their Miami Lakes home was only K-8, Phyllis had to find a high school for her son.

“I stressed more that year than I ever had,” Phyllis said. “Trying to find a high school for him that we could afford and offered academic options. A high school that would tell a child with learning differences that we can work with you.”

There are two public schools near their home, but Phyllis did not view either as viable options for her son.

She thought he would be overwhelmed by the large class sizes and an easy target for bullies.

Phyllis, a single mother, looked into several private schools. They were either too expensive or she did not see them as a good fit for Nicolas.

Several of her friends mentioned Monsignor Edward Pace High School (Pace) which is located less than 10 miles away in Miami Gardens.  At first, Phyllis was not interested, because she and Nicolas are not Catholic. She was told that would not be an issue.

So, Phyllis met with Pace administrators and that is where she learned about the Gardiner Scholarship provided by Step Up For Students for children with certain special needs.

She liked everything about the school and it’s a 1-to-14 teacher-student ratio. Nicolas would be placed in mainstream classes and the teachers would work with him as needed to ensure he would not fall behind.

Nicolas qualified for the Gardiner Scholarship and was accepted to Pace.

“That was phenomenal,” Phyllis said. “We were so excited there was something out there for him.”

***

Phyllis, like most parents, was a little apprehensive about her only child beginning high school.

Nicolas? He strode right in.

“The first time I felt so excited, but also a tiny bit nervous,” Nicolas said. “But after a few days I got used to it.”

It helped, Nicolas said, that he had Dr. Enrique Dominguez for freshman science.

Known as “Poppa D” to his students, Dominguez has a special skill for connecting with students. He and Nicolas connected instantly.

“I saw that beauty inside of him of being absolutely lovable, absolutely showing you that in the face of adversity he was going to do what he needed to do without any complaints,” Dominguez said.

Nicolas aced the class, and Poppa D nominated him for Student of the Year in Science.

“Dr. Dominguez always tells Nicolas how great he can be, and Nicolas comes home every day saying how great he feels,” Phyllis said. “As a mother, you’re grasping at straws to find the right school and then you find one, and we truly are blessed.”

***

There was never a question Nicolas would excel in the classroom. His grades were always above average. He has an insatiable thirst for knowledge with interests ranging from animals to cars to music and composers to anything to do with history.

His favorite composers are Mozart and Tchaikovsky. His favorite ballet is “The Nutcracker.”

He can play guitar and the keyboard, the banjo and the bongos. He loves to play Elvis Presley songs on the ukulele with “Hound Dog” and “Blue Suede Shoes” among his favorites.

Nicolas Ratliff-Batista and Kiwi relaxing at home.

He has a pet parrotlet named Kiwi that likes to sit on his shoulder.

He attends operas with his mom.

On most Saturdays, you can find Nicolas at the local library, where he feeds his curiosities by reading books for as long as six hours.

Whenever English teacher Jorge Rodriguez-Miralles sees Nicolas walking down the hall, he says, “Here comes literature’s greatest fan.”

“Nicolas,” Rodriguez-Miralles said, “is the only student I think I’ve ever had in a class who taught me something about literature, and I have an advanced degree in literature.”

It happened in freshman year when Rodriguez was teaching Greek and Roman mythology. Nicolas knew the backstory to the battle between Poseidon and Athena. Rodriguez-Miralles had not delved that far into the story. Nicolas had.

During Black History Month that same year, Rodriguez-Miralles was showing the movie “Selma” to the class. Music was playing in the background of one scene. Rodriguez-Miralles said it was hardly audible.

Nicolas heard it and said, “Beethoven, 5th Symphony, 3rd movement.”

Rodriguez-Miralles picked up his iPad and searched for Beethoven’s 5th Symphony, 3rd movement. What do you know?

“How many freshmen do you know that can spot correctly the third movement of the fifth symphony of Beethoven? Nic can,” Rodriguez-Miralles said.

The teacher went home, flipped through his music collection and found box set of Beethoven’s symphonies. He gave it to Nicolas the next day.

“Apparently, you’re Beethoven’s greatest fan, so now you can enjoy the symphonies complete,” Rodriguez-Miralles said.

***

It is easy for someone like Nicolas to remain inside his comfort zone, to save his bold moments for the classroom where learning is what he has mastered.

But to the surprise and delight of his mom and teachers, Nicolas slowly began to dip his toes in Pace’s social scene.

Nicolas Ratliff-Batista played a police officer in The Great Gatsby, one of several school plays in which he appeared.

He joined the drama club and has appeared in a number of productions, including a few musicals that required him to sing in front of an auditorium filled with strangers. Not an easy task for most high school students.

His recent role of Sigmund Freud required him to speak with an Austrian accent, which, he nailed.

Homecoming is a big event at Pace with students coming to school dressed as that year’s theme. One year the theme was board games. Nicolas went to school dressed as the Monopoly Man, a picture of which appeared in the yearbook.

“Popular kids get to do that,” Phyllis said. “(At Pace) you are popular because you are a student.”

Nicolas saved his biggest breakout moment for this year’s Powder Puff game when he joined the fellas on the sidelined dressed as a cheerleader while the girls played football.

“He’s doing things that make him a little uncomfortable,” Principal Ana Garcia said, “but he’s not afraid to try, which is a wonderful thing.”

Nicolas had been asked in past years if he wanted to be a cheerleader. He did not.

“Before I thought I would feel all embarrassed inside,” Nicolas said.

Why this year?

“So, I realized I got to take action,” he said. “It’s now or never. I feel like inside I have to do it.”

And now …?

“It was pretty good, like great,” he said.

***

Phyllis believes her son’s growth scholastically and socially stems directly from Mrs. Garcia’s leadership.

“It has to be from her,” Phyllis said. “She has to say to her faculty, ‘This is something we believe in. We believe in our students.’ They really do.”

Mrs. Garcia, who said she is “humbled” to hear that, adding, “Here at the school the general population is very acceptant of kids with differences, and so it’s a great environment for kids who are a little bit different. Somehow, they all find a place where they are accepted, where they can excel, where they can grow and develop.”

Each day, after finishing his lunch, Nicolas walks over to the table where the teachers sit and says hello to each.

“Sometimes I feel like it makes them happy,” Nicolas said.

And he writes Christmas cards to his teachers.

Each year, Phyllis writes a letter to Mrs. Garcia thanking her for the work she and her staff do with Nicolas. Mrs. Garcia shares the letters with her staff and faculty at the beginning of each year.

“It’s very inspiring and very inspirational to start the year that way, because you start on a high,” Mrs. Garcia said.

It is Mrs. Garcia’s way of telling everyone that they do make a difference in the lives of each student.

“And we need to continue to do this,” Mrs. Garcia said, “because if we impact one or two kids like this, for heaven sakes, this is what we need to be doing.”

***

Nicolas had a recent homework assignment where he had to list some of the struggles in his life. He told his mom he could not think of any.

Phyllis reminded him that he falls under the Autism spectrum, that he has trouble making friends, that he was a late talker and that he had difficulty learning to write because he had difficulty learning to hold a pencil.

“He doesn’t see it as a negative or a struggle,” Phyllis said. “He struggled trying to find out what his challenges were.”

Dominguez said he often sees what he called “the courage of a lion” in his students who have Autism.

“He knows what he’s got, but to him, he’s not like, ‘Oh, I’m carrying this cross.’ No, no. he works through it,” Dominguez said. “He’s not oblivious to it, but to him it’s not a reason to stumble and to cry.

“He lives in such a beautiful world. I talk about Nic and I start getting a lump in my throat because I’m going to miss him a lot. He’s that special of a child.”

About Monsignor Edward Pace High

Opened in 1961, Monsignor Pace High or “Pace” is part of the Archdiocese of Miami. It serves 885 students, including more than 500 on Step Up For Student Scholarships. Pace is recognized as a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence by the U.S. Department of Education. It was selected by the Catholic High School Honor Roll as one of the top 50 Catholic Schools in the nation. Pace students take the PSAT/ASPIRE in ninth and 10th grade, the PSAT/ACT in 11th and the AP test all four years. Annual tuition and fees for grades nine to 11 is $12,050 and $12,300 for grade 12.

Marketing Communications Manager Roger Mooney can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

Consider donating to Step Up on #GivingTuesday

By ROGER MOONEY

On Nov. 27, Giving Tuesday, Step Up For Students wants you to consider supporting children in Florida who need a clearer path to a better education.

Donate to Step Up on Tuesday, the global day of donating to nonprofits known worldwide as #GivingTuesday.

Better yet, get your friends and family involved with a Facebook Fundraiser.

“Giving Tuesday is day to pause in the hustle and bustle of the holidays and give back to what truly matters,” said Karis Tuner, Step Up’s director, development. “At Step Up, the chance for families to choose a classroom that fits their children’s needs best matters to us. When you give to Step Up you change the life of a child by opening doors of opportunity that would otherwise be closed. Giving Tuesday may be just one day of the year, but together we can make it the day that forever changed a child’s life.”

Step Up hopes to create 900 Facebook Fundraisers, a number that would represent 3 percent of 30,000-plus people who liked our Facebook page.

Click here for instructions on how to create a Facebook Fundraiser or watch this short video.

#GivingTuesday was started in 2012 by the 92nd Street Y in New York to generate online donations to charities on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. It falls after Black Friday and Cyber Monday and helps kick off the holiday and Christmas seasons.

In 2017, #GivingTuesday raised $274 million, including $45 million on Facebook.

Step Up provides scholarships to more than 115,000 schoolchildren in Florida through four scholarships that help lower-income families, students with special needs, victims of bullying and students in grades 3 through 5 who struggle reading.

Marketing Communications Manager Roger Mooney can be reached at rmooney@sufs.org.

1 2 3 25