Acknowledging Bullying Prevention Awareness Month in October and beyond

By Lisa A. Davis

today's lesson snipI don’t remember how it started, but I recall vividly how it ended. The mean girl in middle school who had been making fun of me for some time took it to the next level and tossed my gym uniform into the toilet. Of course, it was humiliating, and although I tried not to, I let her get to me and dissolved into tears right in front of her.

Bullying comes in many forms – by teasing, ignoring, spreading rumors, hurting someone emotionally or physically — but the result is often the same. The bully’s target may be afraid to go to school (or wherever it occurred), is embarrassed and their self-confidence shattered. In many cases, the child even becomes depressed.

While I don’t remember all that happened after that incident with me all those years ago, I know it was the last time that girl ever bullied me. And I also know that moment made me realize how much another person’s actions – bad or good – can significantly affect you for years to come. I would like to think my situation made me a more compassionate person as the years went on.

At Step Up For Students, we have shared stories about students being bullied and parents seeking school alternatives for their children. Here are a couple from over the years: https://stepupforstudents.org/about-us/our-cause/student-spotlight-details/2015/07/31/layla-and-jeremiah-cirino and https://blog.stepupforstudents.org/jacob-rogers/

Bullying can happen anywhere, even online, at any time, and at any age. It’s something that has become such a major social issue, that October of each year is set aside for National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month. Nearly a decade old, Bullying Prevention Awareness month was started by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center.

To get an idea of what bullying is, here’s the definition stopbullying.gov, a website managed through the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services gives:

Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Both kids who are bullied and who bully others may have serious lingering problems.Anti_Bullying

The troubling thing is, many of us have experience bullying in some form.

Here are some stats compiled by STOMP Out Bullying, a leading national bullying and cyberbullying prevention organization for kids and teens:

  • 1 out of 4 kids are bullied
  • 43 percent of kids have been bullied while online
  • 282,000 students are physically attacked in secondary schools each month
  • 1 out of 5 kids admit to being bullied or doing some “bullying.”

How do you stop bullying? Experts agree that awareness, like for most things, is the key to prevention.

“When you see someone being bullied, be brave and STAND UP for them,” states STOMP Out Bullying’s website. “Bullies have been known to back off when others stand up for victims. If you don’t feel safe get the help of an adult immediately. Be part of the solution — not the problem!”

And finally, the last week of October, students can participate by spreading anti-bullying messages in various ways, including handing out positive messages on Post-it notes, creating anti-bullying videos, sharing inspirational stories and more.

While the month of October is set aside to bring awareness, of course, it is the hope that the efforts continue year-round.

Additional resources:

PACER

Stop Bullying 

STOMP Bullying

CDC

 

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